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Hateful Eight


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#21 Tyler Purcell

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Posted 29 August 2015 - 12:39 PM

Yep… I don't quite understand either. I'm very much into motivated light.
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#22 Tyler Purcell

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Posted 29 August 2015 - 12:41 PM

More details thanks to an article from Indywire : http://blogs.indiewi...adshow-20150828
 

The comeback of motion picture film will literally get its biggest boost yet with the Ultra Panavision 70 release of celluloid defender Quentin Tarantino's post-Civil War Western "The Hateful Eight."

Shot on 65mm film with classic Panavision lenses in the widest aspect ratio of 2.76:1, this marks the first anamorphic 70mm theatrical release in nearly 50 years. The two-week roadshow engagement in 50 theaters (with the Cinerama Dome in contention for LA, of course) will be the best holiday gift for cinephiles.

"The Hateful Eight" will also pit three-time Oscar-winning cinematographer Robert Richardson ("Hugo," "The Aviator," "JFK") in a shoot-out with Emmanuel "Chivo" Lubezki, who's going for a third Oscar in a row for his own frozen wilderness adventure, "The Revenant," from "Birdman" director Alejandro G. Iñárritu. (Both films are racing to the editorial finish line for a Christmas Day release.)

Richardson proclaimed that Ultra Panavision 70 more than reinforces the notion that film can coexist with digital: it provides such unparalleled scope, resolution and beauty that everyone should be using it. "When we saw Sam Jackson in a closeup -- or anyone -- it just aided the skin. It's remarkable. We never used diffusion, the only filters we ever did were outside. It was stunning."

Feeding off "Stagecoach," "The Desperate Hours" and "And Then There Were None," Tarantino's ninth film throws eight travelers together a decade after the Civil War in Wyoming. But a bitter snowstorm prevents them from getting to Red Rock, where bounty hunter John Ruth (Kurt Russell) intends to bring feral-like fugitive Daisy Domergue (Jennifer Jason Leigh) to justice. The ensemble also includes Walton Goggins, Demian Bichir, Tim Roth, Michael Madsen and Bruce Dern.

Tarantino touted seven minutes of footage at Comic-Con through the raging blizzard and then inside a stagecoach stop just outside Red Rock called Minnie's Haberdashery (which we reported). According to Dern, "He has the greatest attention to detail on a set as any director who ever lived, his only rival would be Luchino Visconti. He creates an atmosphere for all of us not to do our greatest work necessarily, but to get better."

The last Ultra Panavision 70 release was "Khartoum" (1966), the biopic with Charlton Heston as British Gen. Charles Gordon. The list also includes "Ben-Hur," "Mutiny on the Bounty," "It's a Mad, Mad, Mad, Mad World," "The Fall of the Roman Empire," "The Greatest Story Ever Told" and "The Battle of the Bulge."

In fact, Panavision took Tarantino into a screening room and surprised him with the chariot race from "Ben-Hur," starting with the sides at the normal width and then spread out to expose the full frame -- and the film nerd was totally hooked on Ultra Panavision 70.

But this all began accidentally: "We went in thinking we were going to shoot standard format for 65mm and one day I was with Gregor Tavenner, my first camera assistant, and Dan Sasaki [Panavision VP of optical engineering] was showing us standard Panavision lenses for 65mm and while looking at them, I slipped behind the curtain and saw this shelf filled with odd-shaped lenses [triangular with prisms]. They were Ultra Panavision lenses," Richardson said.

Sasaki put the lenses up on the projector and Richardson was hooked. Even before testing the lenses, Panavision threw all its weight behind the project, and Kodak and the FotoKem lab were on board as well.

First came testing by Richardson in freezing temperatures while scouting locations in Telluride, Colorado that would benefit them visually, with great mountain vistas. Panavision had to reconfigure and apply new coatings to 19 lenses for focus-pulling. Panavision also made a 2,000-foot magazine for the film cameras to accommodate Tarantino's penchant for long takes. The camera's limit fell just under that length, yet this was still considerably longer than the normal 1,000-ft. magazine could handle.

The team brought a very analogue approach to shooting in Telluride (with few blizzards and rare overcast days) and onstage at LA's Red Studios, where they lowered the temperature to 30 degrees. They screened dailies in 70mm, with no digital intermediate, and the film is being color-timed photochemically, the old-school way, by FotoKem.

Theaters will be retrofitted with anamorphic lenses for 70mm projectors. Yes, there will be a digital release from TWC on January 8, 2016, which will continue to show the film in 70mm as well.

With two cameras at his disposal, and Tarantino operating a couple of shots himself, Richardson had to get used to certain anomalies: slight color alterations when shooting actors' faces after switching lenses — ranging from the triangular ones that provide a bronze look to more user-friendly cylindrical shapes — or odd flaring caused by light bouncing indirectly off the prism when shooting two characters in front of a fireplace.

"The most complex thing for me was that the set was primarily this one building where they arrive in this stagecoach," Richardson explained. "But if you shoot a medium shot with the lenses, anywhere you're seeing two-thirds or more of the room, depending on where the character is, because it's such a wide frame. You're lighting the entire set and other characters are constantly in your frame. Quentin first looked at 'Mad, Mad World'. Part of what happened in that film is that you had a medium shot with all the characters in the frame. It was an adjustment for all of us."

Indoors were lit warm and exteriors cool. Sasaki also altered the lenses for sharpness in closer shots (within three feet). "Quentin likes to shoot a lot of masters because his films are dialogue-driven. We worked with all primes. He accepted what 65mm allowed him. There are more characters in the frame -- at least four in one shot -- and he could see the quality of the image and quick adjustments could be made for makeup and hair [as a result of the 70mm dailies]. We all knew we had limitations and there would be breakdowns with the 65mm camera because they're not used often, but overall there very few problems with the equipment," Richardson said.

Because of the film's claustrophobic, lowly lit nature, however, the use of Ultra Panavision was actually counter-intuitive. But Tarantino wasn't about to turn down this rare historical opportunity. In a clever game of hide-and-seek, he used the frame to deliberately show more or less when he wanted to obscure crucial character information.

"There's a great deal of interior landscape available and the actors loved it. Also, I think they enjoyed the visual feast that was given to them in terms of their own faces," said Richardson, who admitted, though, that throwback photochemical color timing has been frightening.

"I'd become reliant on a digital intermediate for fixing things in post and you can let certain things go. For example, you realize that the backgrounds are blown out but you don't want to take the time to put a hard gel up. You know you can rescue that with the window and tracking, or if your weather doesn't quite match, it's easier to work a look between sunny and overcast.

"In this particular case, there was no fixing: what you shoot is what you get. You're not going in to fix a wall if you didn't put enough light on it; if you're overexposed on that side with sun, you're gonna have sun. There's nothing you can do. So Quentin worked very hard in collaboration in trying to make sure the weather conditions were what he wanted for sequences. And he helped me a great deal in that way. Ordinarily, he says to me, 'If they're looking at your work, they're not listening to my words.' He's going to go for the best performance regardless of the condition of the light."

But not when it came to this gorgeous look. And this is just the beginning, as Gareth Edwards' "Rogue One: A Star Wars Story" is reportedly being shot with Ultra Panavision 70 lenses.


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#23 Jay Young

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Posted 29 August 2015 - 05:21 PM

I read that article the other day.

 

Now I wanna go play in the back shelves at Panavision!


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#24 Adam Frisch FSF

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Posted 21 September 2015 - 06:43 PM

Shafts of light can most certainly be motivated lighting. But perhaps not from above.

 

I am myself sick of indie naturalism, handheld, sun flares, 5d hipster aesthetics. Anything that breaks us away from that, I'm all for. And I say this as a pretty naturalistic lighter.

 

I'm someone who doesn't enjoy Quentin Tarantino movies, but I will make an exception for this just for the Panavision 70 stuff. Saw a trailer at the cinema the other day and I have to say, it looked great on the big screen.


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#25 Robin R Probyn

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Posted 21 September 2015 - 09:38 PM

Wow and double wow.. Adam your reel !!  I think that Hilton CM is just one of the best Ive ever seen.. nice work sir.. 


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#26 David Cunningham

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Posted 29 October 2015 - 01:01 PM

Confirmation that in the greater Boston area the real photochemical print of The Hateful Eight, direct from Fotokem, will be showing starting Christmas Day at the Somerville Theater just outside Boston in Somerville.  It will be an actual, real Super Panavision 70 experience.  I cannot wait, even though I think the film is going to not be that good.  LOL.


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#27 John Holland

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Posted 29 October 2015 - 01:37 PM

Just to point out it's Ultra Panavision 70. I agree I think this is going to be bad ! Think it is going to be waste of shooting 65mm film , don't know for sure but looks like mostly interiors with to much dialogue waste of Ultra Panavision . And for me Samuel L Jackson is a good reason not to watch a film !!


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#28 David Cunningham

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Posted 29 October 2015 - 02:02 PM

HAHA... right ultra... sorry about that.

 

Yeah, it's very interesting and looks like it's gonna be cooky.  We shall see.  But, no such thing as a waste of 65mm film.  Whatever sells more Kodak film the better!  It will keep us Super 8 and 16mm users alive.


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#29 John Holland

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Posted 29 October 2015 - 05:28 PM

Yes more film use the better !! But this has been sold as a big film thing if turns out to be a pile of Shite  it will be another nail in the coffin for the use of film .My big worry !


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#30 Tyler Purcell

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Posted 29 October 2015 - 05:40 PM

I'll say this much, there are two films being shot in 70mm right now and the next Planet of the Apes, which is a remake of the original film, will also be 5 perf 70mm. So that would be four 70mm originated films to be released from December of this year through sometime in 2017. That's not bad, considering we haven't seen a narrative feature shot on 5 perf 70mm prior to 'The Master' since the 90's.

I'm more concerned if studio's are going to consider it a gimmick, charge a lot of money for something that's just digitized and manipulated digitally before printing back to film. That will truly be disheartening because the whole idea is to do things the old school way and deliver something the audience can't see at home.

At least 'Hateful Eight' is doing it the right way. Complete photochemical finish, no green screen, everything in-camera and best of all, the only way to see it is 70mm for the first two weeks.
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#31 John Holland

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Posted 30 October 2015 - 04:45 AM

Think you will find the Planet of Apes film is being shot with the Alexa 65 , not film .


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#32 Tyler Purcell

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Posted 30 October 2015 - 01:57 PM

Think you will find the Planet of Apes film is being shot with the Alexa 65 , not film .


http://screencrush.c...-filming-photo/

Sounds like they're shooting on film to me. Unless of course you have some inside information.
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#33 David Cunningham

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Posted 30 October 2015 - 02:07 PM

Sadly, it's actually the Alexa, not film:

 

https://twitter.com/...510303224926208


Edited by David Cunningham, 30 October 2015 - 02:07 PM.

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#34 Jay Young

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Posted 30 October 2015 - 02:23 PM

To quote Roger Deakins:

 

 

I have seen many tests shot on the Alexa 65 and all have been very impressive.
I do feel that image resolution is not the 'be all and end all' in any definition of quality though. What is quality anyway? Does that make a camera that advertises 8K the best choice for every occasion?

 

And maybe it'll be ok?  They shot Downton Abbey with the D-21 then switched to the Alexa and S4 Cookes.  I THOUGHT it was film until the third season!  Of course, I was watching it on Amazon/Netflix on my 24" computer screen.   That said, I'm sure we all wish the next crop of big features were all shooting 65mm.


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#35 John Holland

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Posted 30 October 2015 - 02:38 PM

Sorry to say but I do have a bit of inside and yes it is Alexa 65 . Sorry I feel as bad as you about it . Along with a lot of other Cinematographers and the BSC and the two labs that that process and transfer film to 4K plus Kodak we are trying very hard to keep film an option !


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#36 Tyler Purcell

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Posted 30 October 2015 - 02:44 PM

Dang, I guess everyone got mixed up then. Too bad. :(

I mean it's good in another way, Panavision and Arri have all their 5 perf 65mm cameras on rental, so at least SOMEONE is shooting film!
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#37 Manu Delpech

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Posted 30 October 2015 - 03:55 PM

I think that if you sit far away from your screen, you won't be able to tell the difference, unless it's a big screen, you really need a big screen, and not be too far away (obviously, duh :D ), or home theater setup with projector and 120 inches + screen. I love watching movies on my 120 inch screen, but I also love sitting really close to my computer screen from time to time and watching movies shot on film, so I really get the texture up close. 


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#38 Tyler Purcell

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Posted 30 October 2015 - 04:43 PM

The point is, you can blow 70mm up onto a huge screen and it doesn't fall apart. Plus because it's a larger negative, registration issues aren't as obvious. Even watching Interstellar's 35mm bits, optically blown up to 70mm was like watching digital projection, it was rock solid. In IMAX, the credit sequence at the end was so crisp and flawless, I had to turn around to see whether they changed projectors.
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#39 Mark Sperry

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Posted 02 November 2015 - 11:51 AM

I think that if you sit far away from your screen, you won't be able to tell the difference, unless it's a big screen, you really need a big screen, and not be too far away (obviously, duh :D ), or home theater setup with projector and 120 inches + screen. I love watching movies on my 120 inch screen, but I also love sitting really close to my computer screen from time to time and watching movies shot on film, so I really get the texture up close. 

 

 

I have a 60" Vizio tv and even when The Master comes on, on HBO (so not the best feed), I can see the difference.  Colors are richer, the depth of the image is finer, and of course very low grain.  I never buy that 'won't see the difference' argument.  Format influences the look of the final image far more than people realize.  That's why I love the variation we have these days, from Super 8 to 70mm to Alexa65!    


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#40 Scott Pickering

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Posted 02 November 2015 - 05:46 PM

I was hoping the new Planet of the Apes was shot on film, but I have also read its the Alexa 65. They are shooting it locally to me here and in the Valley. I want to see Hateful 8 on 70mm projection, but I don't believe there is one film theater left for 70mm here in Vancouver. I asked the Seattle Cinerama theater if they will be showing it. They have Star Wars booked for the time period, but they said its possible they may show Hateful 8 after Star Wars has ended. Whether they show digital or film would be in question, since the Seattle Cinerama prides itself using a 4K laser projection setup.

 

There was talk earlier that demand for shooting on 65mm has increased of late, that Panavision was considering building new cameras to meet demand. They haven't decided on that yet.

 

Where is the theater list I can view to see who is showing Hateful 8 in 70mm? I want to see this badly, but don't know what my closest option is.


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