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Beginner: Storyboarding


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#1 Ellison Williams

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Posted 24 April 2015 - 11:23 AM

Does anyone know any books that will help me learn the art of drawing and composition, specifically for film?

 

Like I said, I don't even know how to draw.  I have a good eye but I would like a book that deals with art direction in very basic terms for the beginner. 

 

Any suggestions?

 

Thanks! 


Edited by Ellison Williams, 24 April 2015 - 11:24 AM.

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#2 Brian Drysdale

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Posted 24 April 2015 - 11:32 AM

I would get some life drawing lessons at a local college or art centre. You'll get some practice with real subjects and advice from teachers who are often artists in their own right. Its something you need to do rather than just read about and this is how the stroyboard artists I know learnt their basic skills.


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#3 John E Clark

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Posted 24 April 2015 - 03:32 PM

There is Frame Forge, which is relatively expensive... and I've not found a really good free/cheap alternative, that is set up for film storyboarding.


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#4 Ellison Williams

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Posted 24 April 2015 - 04:30 PM

Thank you.  Both great suggestions.  I really like the idea of taking a class.  That was my initial plan, but then I thought, I can teach myself.  But I think you hit the nail on the head; the class assignments and deadlines will make me actually do it.

 

Thanks. 


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#5 Brian Drysdale

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Posted 25 April 2015 - 01:45 AM

I did some life drawing classes which had a model (usually nude) where the teacher gave time limits, some as short as seconds, but the main drawings were usually 1/2 hour to 3/4 hour although you can get classes which spend longer on each pose.


Edited by Brian Drysdale, 25 April 2015 - 01:46 AM.

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#6 Gregg MacPherson

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Posted 25 April 2015 - 10:47 AM

I'm 100% with Brian on this. You will never regret learning some drawing skills. The idea(s) in your mind will become visible more easily. Not the clunky deconstructed shape of it. Something expressing the idea itself. What is an idea? Learn to draw. Find out.

Drawing is very direct. It doesn't require several layers of programming lanuage to support it. A lump of charcoal or crayon will do.

I heard that Ridley Scott sketches his story boardish notes while being driven to the set. Eisenstein drew well. His development notes are pepered with great sketches. Each one a potent little kernel of idea. Aspire to that.

EDIT: attempted better spelling.

Edited by Gregg MacPherson, 25 April 2015 - 10:51 AM.

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