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Very basic questions


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#1 Grace Fleming

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Posted 03 May 2015 - 05:18 AM

I am writing a story for publication, and I know nothing! I would like to know some things that are probably going to sound very dumb.
1. Using a Canon 1014 XLS 8mm movie camera from the late 70s, would film be sent off for processing? Could you send it from a drug store or would it be done by mail?
2. Would it be possible to make or order photos from the film, and how long would that take?
3. I am hoping the processes would take a week or so, so if there is a better camera to use to make this more realistic, please let me know!
4 Is this a film that would have to be viewed by projector in 1984?

Any general comments about what it would be like to use this camera would be wonderful!

I would so appreciate any help! Thanks, Grace
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#2 Mark Dunn

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Posted 03 May 2015 - 05:39 AM

Do you mean to find out how things were done in 1984? If so, then in the UK, Super-8 film was sold process-paid and returned by post to the processor. it took about a week. All the films were reversal then, so yes, they would be projected.

I believe that Kodak was legally prevented from selling process-paid films in the US, so they had to be taken to a lab or third party for despatch, even if Kodak usually did the processing anyway.


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#3 Brian Drysdale

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Posted 03 May 2015 - 05:54 AM

The most common film in the 1970s would probably be Kodachrome it was posed to be developed (processed paid), I don't know about the US, but in the UK it usually took about a week.

 

The lab was a specialised lab that only handled the processing, any printed frames would need to be arranged by the film maker probably as a B&W print home job (colour home processing wasn't that common) or perhaps photographing the screen as the film was projected. Super 8 would be a bit fiddly in a photographic enlarger, although I've done prints from 16mm B & Neg which were grainy, Super 8 would be even worse and being reversal makes it more complicated.

 

The film would usually be viewed on a projector, although by 1984 there may be some films that were transferred for viewing on VHS or Betamax, but most would still be projected.


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#4 Grace Fleming

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Posted 03 May 2015 - 06:46 AM

You all are lifesavers. Yes, this is happening in 1984 but the camera would be a few years old at the time. I was hoping to say that this guy would have to wait a week to see what was on the film, so this is great. I'd welcome any more comments about the process - it is set in the US.
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#5 Mark Dunn

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Posted 03 May 2015 - 07:38 AM

When I took in some 35mm. K64 to a SF lab in the late 80s I believe it may have been a 48 or 72-hour service, but that was presumably couriered to Kodak, so with USPS, which I know isn't too speedy in the US, you're safe with a week.


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#6 Doug Palmer

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Posted 03 May 2015 - 07:50 AM

Kodachrome wasn't  used always though.  Ektachrome 160 was a different process, and it was often done by smaller companies in a very short time.   It tended to be much more grainy than Kodachrome (it was suitable for low light as well).   Have you seen  "Super-8" the feature ?  The kids filming the train crash take their film to the local camera store or drugstore to process. Not sure when it's meant to be set.


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#7 Doug Palmer

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Posted 03 May 2015 - 07:55 AM

1979  I think !


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#8 David Mullen ASC

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Posted 03 May 2015 - 01:23 PM

Ektachrome Super-8 took a few days to come back from the lab after dropping it off at a drug store unless you went directly to a lab that handled it.

 

Even in 1984, you'd watch it directly on a projector.  Later you might have gotten a cheap transfer onto VHS.

 

No, it was very hard to make photos from the film strip, though possible, so it was rarely done with Super-8. First of all, you'd have to take the time to select what frames to copy over.  People did it themselves sometimes using a modified holder to attach the strip in front of a macro lens on a still camera, similar to what is used to copy slides.  I can't find any reference online though to such a device for Super-8 but here is an article about copying slides with a still camera:

http://www.scantips.com/es-1.html


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