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What is this light?


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#1 Fernando Nicolas

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Posted 03 May 2015 - 10:19 PM

http://i.imgur.com/2wE0kUm.jpg

 

It's a still from Michael Mann's BLACKHAT. I'm curious as to what light this is, what diffusion, how far from the actors, etc.

Thank you very much. 


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#2 David Mullen ASC

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Posted 03 May 2015 - 11:03 PM

It's a green light hitting the actors from slightly low.  Could be anything -- you could create this effect twenty different ways...


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#3 Fernando Nicolas

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Posted 04 May 2015 - 01:10 AM

What would be the most portable/mobile and cost efficient way to light this? 

Thanks David. 


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#4 Bill DiPietra

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Posted 04 May 2015 - 09:25 AM

What would be the most portable/mobile and cost efficient way to light this? 

 

You could easily gel just about any kind of light to get this effect.  If you were to use a fresnel, I don't think you'd need more than a 300w, but the source looks a bit softer, so it might be a fluorescent lamp that's being used.

 

Also, bear in mind that it looks like this scene was shot on digital (lots of noise at the bottom of the frame.)  So you would need less light output than if you were using film.


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#5 Phil Rhodes

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Posted 04 May 2015 - 10:25 AM

You can actually get green-emitting fluorescent tubes quite cheaply. I have some for green screen work but I've used them for effects light. You need to be a bit cautious as they really are very green.

 

P


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#6 Bill DiPietra

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Posted 04 May 2015 - 10:31 AM

You can actually get green-emitting fluorescent tubes quite cheaply. I have some for green screen work but I've used them for effects light. You need to be a bit cautious as they really are very green.

 

P

 

Yup.  Looks like they're right here: https://www.1000bulb...-guard-sleeves/


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#7 Fernando Nicolas

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Posted 04 May 2015 - 12:32 PM

Is there any way to get that effect with a battery-powered source? 


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#8 Bill DiPietra

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Posted 04 May 2015 - 12:51 PM

Is there any way to get that effect with a battery-powered source? 

 

Such as?...


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#9 Phil Rhodes

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Posted 04 May 2015 - 05:36 PM

You can filter LEDs, although I'm pretty sure I've seen green-emitting LEDs natively. You could jury-rig something with off-the-shelf parts, too - those hundred-watt LED clusters are available in the primary colours. 

 

Unfortunately, not very many LED manufacturers offer colour options, which ought to be easy, especially with remote phosphor types.

 

P


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#10 Bill DiPietra

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Posted 04 May 2015 - 05:45 PM

Is there any way to get that effect with a battery-powered source? 

 

Why don't you tell us what you have access to so we can give you better advice?...


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#11 Fernando Nicolas

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Posted 04 May 2015 - 10:50 PM

I'm trying to recreate that look with a battery-powered light source, the cheapest possible/available. Night exteriors, don't have access to a generator. 


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#12 Satsuki Murashige

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Posted 05 May 2015 - 12:58 AM

Just rent a bi-color 1x1 Litepanel with v-lock batteries and bring a small selection of Plus Green and diffusion gel, plus a 4x4 bounce card. You'll prob want to bounce the Litepanel into the bounce card about 5 feet away from camera right and dim it way down to match the ambient light levels. If you can't get bi-color then bring a selection of CTO and CTB gels.
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#13 Kemalettin Sert

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Posted 06 May 2015 - 09:35 PM

 We had some LED panels and small tungsten units hidden between the concrete roof beams above the main part of the set,

 

 

There is article about this movie (Blackhat) on February 15 ASC magazine.


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#14 Bill DiPietra

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Posted 11 May 2015 - 05:36 PM

So after having seen this scene when I watched the film today - highly recommended, by the way - it looks like it was a large soft source lit from screen-right.


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#15 andrew dean

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Posted 13 May 2015 - 05:00 AM

I've been doing more and more FX lighting lately with my kick lights by riftlabs.  They'd do this look easy-as.  I do a hillbilly ramble about them in the middle of this video: 


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