Jump to content




Photo

Should I work in a movie/tv set?


  • Please log in to reply
2 replies to this topic

#1 Berker Taşkıran

Berker Taşkıran
  • Basic Members
  • PipPip
  • 22 posts
  • Student

Posted 08 May 2015 - 03:00 PM

Hello. I am 25, I live in Turkey, I currently study film in a university in my first year. I haven't shot anything, not even a short film. I have zero experience. I wrote one short screenplay, and writing one short and one feature screenplays. I have many other ideas I haven't scriptized yet. I believe I am a very creative person. I want to be a writer director. I was planning on shooting my first short film this summer, with my university friends. I believe it can be very good. So I was seeking ways to gain experience and a few days ago I met a tv director, thanks to a mutual friend. He is willing to set me up an intership in a film or tv set by asking his fellow director friends. There is no certain info. But we're talking about 6 am to 11 pm a full week 8 weeks of work. I know in Hollywood most films take a few months to shoot but in my country most films probably take 2 weeks. So if it's 8 weeks it's probably a tv set. And an episode of a tv show in my country is about 120 minutes. Yes, this is not a typo. I have no car of my own and it will probably take at least 1 hour to travel to and from set. So if this 6 am 11 pm thing becomes constant I won't even have time to sleep. What I have in mind is to ask him that if he can find me a job that's at most 4 weeks. So even at worst case scenario it will last only 1 month and then I will be done with it. As far as I'm concerned 1 or 2 weeks is probably all I need to fully get what's going on on a set. And I don't have any aim to do my work in my country so making connections or acquiring any positions is no concern. I really value my free time and I want to shoot my short film this summer so 8 weeks will probably be not good for me. But at the same time I don't want to miss this opportunity and I am not sure without seeing such a place I will be comfortable. I don't think I will have trouble shooting my short film or even my first feature film (one-room type) but I probably will want this experience. And there is no guarantee I will have this chance again. Oh and also I plan on continuing my study in Germany or UK next year and I can't shoot this particular short film anywhere else than here. Now I know I can always write another screenplay or shoot my short film in the remaining 1 month but that brings certain risks and I don't work well under pressure. That's about it. So what do you think I should do? I have less than 24 hours to decide.


  • 0




#2 Satsuki Murashige

Satsuki Murashige
  • Sustaining Members
  • 3081 posts
  • Cinematographer
  • San Francisco, CA

Posted 08 May 2015 - 05:01 PM

6am to 11pm is a super long day, sounds rough. And 8 weeks of that is a really long time. On the other hand you'll probably learn a ton. I suppose worst case you can always quit after a month if you feel like there's nothing more to gain out of the experience.

If you do decide to go for it, then commit yourself 100%, watch and listen as much as possible, and talk as little as possible except to ask questions. Don't be late. Don't touch anybody's tools or equipment without permission. Don't hesitate to ask lots of questions, just be aware of when someone is busy and needs to concentrate on work at the moment. Remember people's names and what they do as quickly as possible. You'll probably get yelled at more than once by one of your bosses, just keep your mouth shut, accept it and move on. It's important to develop a thick skin in this business.

Most importantly, don't let yourself be put in a physically dangerous situation. You have a right to your own health and safety, and no movie or tv show is worth getting seriously injured or killed for. You have your whole life ahead of you, and every job in the film business ends sooner or later. Life is ultimately more important than work. Good luck!
  • 0

#3 Brian Drysdale

Brian Drysdale
  • Basic Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 4745 posts
  • Cinematographer

Posted 09 May 2015 - 02:34 AM

Sleep would seem to be the big issue, it would be worth finding somewhere to stay closer to the location. You wouldn't want to be driving after a run of such long days, I worked on a TV series on which the crew burnt the candle at both ends and got little sleep; the producer crashed his car after a couple of weeks.


Edited by Brian Drysdale, 09 May 2015 - 02:34 AM.

  • 0


Zylight

Aerial Filmworks

rebotnix Technologies

Broadcast Solutions Inc

Glidecam

Technodolly

Ritter Battery

Willys Widgets

CineLab

Tai Audio

CineTape

Paralinx LLC

Visual Products

Pro 8mm

Rig Wheels Passport

Abel Cine

The Slider

Glidecam

The Slider

Technodolly

Paralinx LLC

CineLab

rebotnix Technologies

CineTape

Abel Cine

Ritter Battery

Tai Audio

Broadcast Solutions Inc

Rig Wheels Passport

Willys Widgets

Aerial Filmworks

Visual Products

Pro 8mm

Zylight