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Car sucker mount vibration?


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#1 Rod Lewis

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Posted 13 May 2015 - 01:04 PM

Hello!

Any advice as to how to minimise the amount of vibration that occurs when driving with my Canon 5DMKIII on my car bonnet? I have a dencent-ish mount rig (picture included) but the footage I got on my first attempt was awfully shaky, despite the rig being very securely attached.

 

Any ideas as to how I can minimise the shake? Maybe I could put a ratchet strap round the car or something? Also, I shot with the battery grip on the bottom. In my mind the extra weight might actually help steady the camera. Is that correct, or does that not actually help in this case? Also, I was using a very heavy lense for the test - the Canon L 24-70. Next time I'll be using the Zeiss 50mm 1.4. A different vehicle perhaps? I'm liking my car because it has lots of tyre (only 15" alloys), so guessing it's a smoothish ride. Maybe a bigger, heavier vehicle?

 

If anyone has any advice on this at all please tell me know!

 

Thanks!

 

Rod

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Edited by Rod Lewis, 13 May 2015 - 01:07 PM.

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#2 ian dart

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Posted 13 May 2015 - 05:35 PM

you probably need to lock down the top of the camera to reduce the vibrations

i would be putting safety straps on it to stop that very expensive sound if it all goes wrong,

 

cheers

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#3 Rod Lewis

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Posted 13 May 2015 - 05:44 PM

Hey that's a great looking set up there. I'd love to know what exactly that is that fits into the hotshoe mount on top of the camera?

 

I've been 60mph with the set up in my photo for quite a while. It's certainly secure, but yeah, shaky. Even at 30mph it's shaky.

 

The device attached to the top certainly looks handy though, as do the straps.

 

Interesting that kind of mini tripod mount you have there. Looks very sturdy indeed.

 

Thanks


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#4 ian dart

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Posted 13 May 2015 - 06:29 PM

hi rod,

i used a magic arm to attach to the hot shoe mount on the camera to stop the vibrations on the camera.

 

the tripod is a manfrotto hi hat attached to 3 aluminium glass handling suction cups that have been tapped

with 3/8 threaded bolts to mate with the 3/8 holes on the hi hat.

 

this mount is as steady as a rock. we tried to rip it off and the bonnet will come off before the suction gives away.

 

i would definitely use some form of safety strapping to keep it on for everyones safety.

 

cheers


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#5 Rod Lewis

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Posted 13 May 2015 - 07:58 PM

hi rod,

i used a magic arm to attach to the hot shoe mount on the camera to stop the vibrations on the camera.

 

the tripod is a manfrotto hi hat attached to 3 aluminium glass handling suction cups that have been tapped

with 3/8 threaded bolts to mate with the 3/8 holes on the hi hat.

 

this mount is as steady as a rock. we tried to rip it off and the bonnet will come off before the suction gives away.

 

i would definitely use some form of safety strapping to keep it on for everyones safety.

 

cheers

 

Great stuff Ian, thanks. You you have any opinion about the battery grip I have in my pic? I'm wondering if the weight will be useful or not. I can remove it - though not sure I remember where I left the original flap door thingy lol.


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#6 ian dart

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Posted 14 May 2015 - 03:44 AM

i am not sure how the battery grip attaches to the camera but i would do a check to ensure the join

 can handle the stress and forces the camera is subjected to.

 

the grip is being held on the car mount by a 1/4 inch screw  but what is holding the grip to the camera.

if it is just a plastic retraining clip i would not use it.

 

cheers


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#7 Sanjay Sami

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Posted 14 May 2015 - 03:56 AM

Take out the battery grip. It adds a joint which could add vibration and the weight is of no benefit.

The straps in Ians picture are the way to go and the magic arm holding the top of the camera is a great move.


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#8 Miguel Cordeiro

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Posted 14 May 2015 - 11:19 AM

The smaller the rims, the more air they have inside, if you can find a car with 13" or 14" it will be smoother, you can also take some pressure off the tires (not much!) to give them more "travel".

If you can find a BMW or a Mercedes, even older ones, they usually have a smooth suspension.


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#9 JD Hartman

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Posted 15 May 2015 - 06:00 AM

You have three suctions mounts grouped too close together and modern auto sheet-metal is as rigid as tinfoil.

  Move two of them forward and toward the edge of the hood where it  meets the fenders.  The metal is folded over there and stiffer.

  I don't see a safety line attached to the camera.  You should always safety the camera to a separate mounting point.


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#10 Rod Lewis

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Posted 15 May 2015 - 09:09 AM

You have three suctions mounts grouped too close together and modern auto sheet-metal is as rigid as tinfoil.
  Move two of them forward and toward the edge of the hood where it  meets the fenders.  The metal is folded over there and stiffer.
  I don't see a safety line attached to the camera.  You should always safety the camera to a separate mounting point.


Hey thanks! Would you say that the sucker on the left is close enough to the windscreen? So maybe if two were that close out would be better?

Thanks. I'll use a strap.

R
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#11 JD Hartman

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Posted 15 May 2015 - 09:40 AM

Probably.  When mounted, if you can push on the camera and see the hood flex, it's certainly going to do so when driving. 


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#12 Rod Lewis

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Posted 15 May 2015 - 09:50 AM

Probably.  When mounted, if you can push on the camera and see the hood flex, it's certainly going to do so when driving.


Thats interesting. Maybe if I strap the gear down very tight I can press the hood down hard so it can't flex? If that makes any sense?
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#13 JD Hartman

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Posted 15 May 2015 - 10:08 AM

I'm no expert in car rigs, but have observed disturbing things done to private vehicles on small shoots, by so called experts

If you pre-load the hood by tensioning the rig against the sheetmetal with a ratchet strap, you risk passing the yield point of the steel, the point of no return where you've created a crease or circular depression.  Most over the hood mounts rely on transferring the weight of the camera, through a cheese plate onto two lengths of speedrail mounted to the fenders.  Look in the Matthews catalog to get an idea of how it could be done and some of the equipment used to make it safe for the driver, the car and the camera, etc..  Matthews has some videos demonstrating their products on Utube.


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#14 JD Hartman

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Posted 15 May 2015 - 10:35 AM

http://www.cinematog...showtopic=67372

 

What Brian and Andrew are telling you is correct.


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#15 Rod Lewis

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Posted 15 May 2015 - 10:51 AM

http://www.cinematog...showtopic=67372

 

What Brian and Andrew are telling you is correct.

 

They're giving me good info, and what they're saying is true, but I wouldn't necessarily say that it's correct so much as another option (with a regard to using a beam rather than mounts).

 

The mount system in my second pic on the BMW was smooth as hell. My DOP used the same system for the last Audi advert. Unfortunately he's un-contactable though, let alone able to work on these pick ups.

 

Not saying I don't appreciate the advice, but sucker mounts do work. I just don't have a DOP for these pic ups so I'm all alone!

 

I've gained some useful tips from these threads though, so thank you to all concerned.


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#16 Brian Drysdale

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Posted 15 May 2015 - 11:16 AM

A BMW or Audi is going to have a more solid construction than say a cheaper car.  Much depends on the car and its design.


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#17 Rod Lewis

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Posted 15 May 2015 - 11:26 AM

A BMW or Audi is going to have a more solid construction than say a cheaper car.  Much depends on the car and its design.

 

I've got an Audi and it has only 15" rims, so I'll let a little air out the tyres and drive about 35 mph and see how I go! To be fair, last time I didn't have a strap or anything holding the top of the camera down and also the battery grip and a heavy Canon 24-70L lense.. I'm hoping that if I get a magic arm on top of the hot shoe mount, use a a strap, remove the bettery grip and use the lighter Zeis lense it'll be a bit smoother.

 

Will let you know how it goes!


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#18 Sanjay Sami

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Posted 15 May 2015 - 05:00 PM

The weight of your DSLR should not be an issue for the hood of your car. Adding straps and grabbing the camera from the top should work well. Get rid of the battery grip if you can.

 

This is a link to a rigging page on my website. It hasn't been updated in about 7 years, but there are some photos of rigs with bigger cameras.

 

http://www.thegripwo...om/rigging.html


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#19 Sanjay Sami

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Posted 15 May 2015 - 05:11 PM

This kind of rig needs a lot more work and reinforcement. As you get lighter and lighter, it becomes easier to lock down, with a lot less stress on the car and the rig.

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#20 Rod Lewis

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Posted 15 May 2015 - 08:44 PM

This kind of rig needs a lot more work and reinforcement. As you get lighter and lighter, it becomes easier to lock down, with a lot less stress on the car and the rig.

 

Wow that's some pretty high end stuff you're up to there!

 

I can't take the battery grip off frustratingly because I have lost the original lid. Spent all night looking for it lol.


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