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Car Sucker Mount Vibration?


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#1 Rod Lewis

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Posted 13 May 2015 - 01:06 PM

Hello!

 

Any advice as to how to minimise the amount of vibration that occurs when driving with my Canon 5DMKIII on my car bonnet? I have a dencent-ish mount rig (picture included) but the footage I got on my first attempt was awfully shaky, despite the rig being very securely attached.

 

Any ideas as to how I can minimise the shake? Maybe I could put a ratchet strap round the car or something? Also, I shot with the battery grip on the bottom. In my mind the extra weight might actually help steady the camera. Is that correct, or does that not actually help in this case? Also, I was using a very heavy lense for the test - the Canon L 24-70. Next time I'll be using the Zeiss 50mm 1.4. A different vehicle perhaps? I'm liking my car because it has lots of tyre (only 15" alloys), so guessing it's a smoothish ride. Maybe a bigger, heavier vehicle?

 

If anyone has any advice on this at all please tell me know!

 

Thanks!

 

Rod

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Edited by Rod Lewis, 13 May 2015 - 01:06 PM.

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#2 Brian Drysdale

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Posted 13 May 2015 - 03:08 PM

You shouldn't double post, it causes confusion. Grip is good place for this question. The vibration levels may depend on the flexibility of the car bonnet, I'd certainly use a racket strap as a safety measure.


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#3 Rod Lewis

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Posted 13 May 2015 - 05:32 PM

Hmm not much action in either really. Thanks for the bonnet flexibility info though. I'll take that on board.


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#4 andrew dean

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Posted 13 May 2015 - 06:29 PM

I've given up on most hood mounts.  I always mount to the window if i can, or at the very least triangulate to it.  I bought the full matthews mastermount and struggled with dslrs so i ended up buying another 2 mounting cups and rods as well.  Some things that did help were 1. a lens support so you can tie down the lens Under "bounce strain", the 1/4-20 on the bottom is floppy as is the lens to camera join.  A rail or lens support can tie those two loose points together which helped 2. a bar supporting the hot shoe (also floppy, but tying to both helped) and 3. finding the most stable part of the car possible. (usually the glass, but the closest point to a corner/join is often ok)).  on modern cars, the hoods are just too floppy, especially in the middle where you'd think to put the camera.  

 

I rambled about some of my experiences here if that helps: http://www.hillbilly...unting-kit.html I never bothered posting about my followup with the additional gear, but after mounting to the window with a lens support and 4 tie points (some to the mount and some to the shoe mount) i ended up getting pretty good results.    Hope that helps!


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#5 Rod Lewis

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Posted 13 May 2015 - 06:59 PM

Hey awesome thanks for this lot. I'll take a good look at that link! :)

 

With my set up in the photo my feeling is that actually perhaps there's too much weight for the mount set up with the battery pack underneath and the 24-70 f2.8. I might do better without it and the Zeiss lens is also lighter. Perhaps I can mount it as close to the windscreen as possible as well.

 

Here was our main set up for the film with the C300 and Superspeeds. The footage is lovely and smooth. This was shooting into the car. I'm now just shooting forwards from the bonnet. Looks a mess and you'll probably notice the camera was uspidde down, but you get the jist:

 

10290159_10204516106683195_3684716899090


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#6 andrew dean

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Posted 13 May 2015 - 08:13 PM

The c300 has a MUCH beefier mount at the bottom, so I can't help but think that helped.  I filmed a couple different dslr on my mount to see where it was flexing and with a longer lens (not like a "long" lens, but 24-105) you could see the lens moving slightly separately from the body.  (1ds and 5d were more solid than the cheaper dslr, but that's no big surprise. heh)  Again, the c300 has more metal at the lens join...  so, it probably just all adds up.  I've put a red epic and sony f55 on hoods on my mastermount now, and with 5 points of contact it was great so it seems to be the distribution of the weight more than just "the weight".  (with only 3, they had a bit of jiggle).

 

Oh, and the car makes a HUGE difference.  People keep coming to me with old beaters. Oh for a cadillac! hehe.


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#7 Brian Drysdale

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Posted 14 May 2015 - 02:10 AM

I usually use a beam across the bonnet, rather than a suction mount. On one low budget film we made a wooden one, you could rock the car with it, but there was no vibration; changing camera angle with that set up was a breeze.


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