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Is Kodak Vision3 250D sensitive enough for night exteriors?


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#1 Vadim Joy

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Posted 18 May 2015 - 06:39 PM

So here's a deal. Need to shoot night exterior scene in the forest. There will be fire. I have a choice of using Kodak 250D or Fuji, similar speed. The challenge is that we don't have enough lights. However I have T1.5 lens. I was thinking going natural, rather than trying to light it. Is 250D sensitive enough? 


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#2 David Mullen ASC

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Posted 18 May 2015 - 07:54 PM

250D is fast enough to shoot by firelight (though the image would be very orange-y) but if the fire is the only source, the fall-off is a factor, not to mention the size of the fire.  If it's a shot of people next to a large campfire, then yes, you have enough light to shoot.  But if it's a shot of a row of trees 100' from that fire, probably not.


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#3 Vadim Joy

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Posted 18 May 2015 - 08:04 PM

Thanks for quick reply David. Yes it's gonna be a shot of people sitting around campfire. Is that orange look bad?
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#4 David Mullen ASC

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Posted 18 May 2015 - 11:10 PM

No, it's just that you'd already get orange from real firelight on tungsten-balanced stock; it's just going to be more strongly orange on daylight stock.  "Backdraft" shot all of their fire scenes on 250D stock for that reason, to make the fire more orange. It's just a choice.


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#5 Vadim Joy

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Posted 19 May 2015 - 01:31 AM

No, it's just that you'd already get orange from real firelight on tungsten-balanced stock; it's just going to be more strongly orange on daylight stock.  "Backdraft" shot all of their fire scenes on 250D stock for that reason, to make the fire more orange. It's just a choice.

Thank you sir. 


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#6 Adrian Sierkowski

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Posted 19 May 2015 - 10:14 AM

You can also push the 250 a stop to 500; though I'd meter for 400.

 

See if you can get some 4x4 mirror boards and lots of shiney boards/white cards, which you can use to throw light around as well.

 

Something else to really thing about is whether or not you're on 35 of 16mm. If you're on 35mm then I personally thing you can torture the film a bit more and fix it in post as it's less grainy. however on 16mm, since the grain is already larger, you get slightly less wiggle room than you would on 35mm. That said I'd recommend going to a 500T stock or going crazy and tracking down some Reala 500D for the fire scene  as opposed to a 1 stop push-- though V3 stock is all pretty forgiving regardless of film gauge.


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#7 Omar Alboukharey

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Posted 16 July 2015 - 10:39 AM

Shoot on the Vision3 500T, it's much safer and more satisfying ;)


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