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conencting camera to a monitor hrough wirelss device

acwireless dit monitor transmission teradek

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#1 davide sorasio

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Posted 21 May 2015 - 02:43 PM

Hi everybody,

I'm still a student and I've never connected a camera to a monitor through a wireless device (I know really common one is the teradek beam). I've tried to look for tutorial but nothing valuable came out. I'll be on a shoot next week that is gonna use ione and I'd like to be prepared so I'm asking for help out here. Another thing I'd like to know is how the wireless follow focus would be connectd to a camera.

I also ran into terms like decoder and encoder and I'm looking for an understandable answer to what the difference is.

Thanks so much for your help!


Edited by davide sorasio, 21 May 2015 - 02:45 PM.

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#2 Gregory Irwin

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Posted 21 May 2015 - 10:56 PM

I'm not sure exactly how to answer your question.  Wireless devices operate on specefic bandwidths.  You simply attach the device to the camera via power cable and BNC or other cables that are required and off you go.  For example, the Preston wireless focus system works on a digital, microwave 2.4 ghz. bandwidth.  I'm sure that this is still confusing...

 


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#3 Satsuki Murashige

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Posted 22 May 2015 - 01:52 AM

Usually, you rent a wireless video system that consists of a video transmitter and one or more receivers. You attach the transmitter to the camera, supply it with power, and feed it a video signal. Put the receiver within line of sight of the transmitter and within the recommended range of the device, supply it with power, and attach a video cable to a monitor. That's pretty much it.

If you're not getting a picture, then check that you have power going to all devices, that video cables are plugged into the correct inputs/outputs, that the TX and RX are within range and line of sight. Move the RX closer and get both TX and RX as high as possible. Point the antennae toward each other. Try a different radio channel or move away from other RF sources that may be causing interference. When in doubt, reboot and power cycle the system.

There are a lot of brands out there. Most of them operate off of radio frequencies and usually the higher the price, the better the range.
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#4 davide sorasio

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Posted 02 June 2015 - 06:31 PM

Thank you so much! That's what I wanted to know!


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