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Far From The Madding Crowd by Charlotte Bruus Christensen

Charlotte Bruus Christensen Far From The Madding Crowd Thomas Vintenberg Cinematography 35mm Kodak 50D

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#1 Miguel Angel

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Posted 23 May 2015 - 07:09 PM

Far From The Madding Crowd, directed by Thomas Vinterberg and photographed by Charlotte Bruus Christensen.

 

far-from-the-madding-crowd-film-2015-hab

 

IMDB

http://www.imdb.com/...ref_=ttfc_fc_tt

 

Trailer

 

Synopsis

In Victorian England, the independent and headstrong Bathsheba Everdene attracts three very different suitors: Gabriel Oak, a sheep farmer; Frank Troy, a reckless Sergeant; and William Boldwood, a prosperous and mature bachelor.

 

I am going to let this post open because I need to be able to articulate a critic in a reasonable language rather than a critic full of WOWs and AMAZING. 

What I am going to say though is, if you like cinematography and photography, go and see it. 

Phil probably won't like it because of the "British hand - held indie camera work style" :P but it is very well done in this one and with a bit of analysis on the sequences. 

 

For me it has been one of those movies that open your mind and bring it to another level. 

 

More soon! 

 

Have a good day!

 


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#2 Igor Trajkovski

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Posted 24 May 2015 - 08:02 AM

Another remake?

 

I recently (re)watched  the 1967 film.

 

After having that beautiful and pleasurable experience of a classic,

with the super-annoying Bathsheba portrayed by Julie Christie,

and the kindness, principles and patience of Gabriel played by Alan Bates,

i don't know i am ready for another go... :)

 

I like Vinterberg's "Festen" and "The Hunt".

Will check this one out too someday.

 

Best

 

Igor


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#3 John Holland

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Posted 24 May 2015 - 04:42 PM

I have the seen the new one much prefer the 1967 version think its Nic Roegs  best work as a DoP .


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#4 Miguel Angel

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Posted 25 May 2015 - 08:46 AM

Well, after watching it again in the cinemas I can only say that it is the most poetic, visually orientated and splendid movie that I have seen this year so far. 

 

I really like all the previous versions, especially the one from Nicolas Roegs. 

However, the one that Thomas Vinterberg just directed feels (obviously) more contemporary. organic and creates feelings in me that the other ones didn't do, and that's a big thing.

 

Charlotte's cinematography is just astonishing, very creative and sometimes very risky! Very deep blacks (which I like), contrast and a richness in the colours that digital cannot achieve nowadays plus the camera work which amazed me a lot. 

 

Sure it has the "hand - held independent British" camera work but it is very exquisite and the mix between hand - held and dollies is quite beautiful and impeccable. 

 

The camera is where it has to be all the times, showing what it has to show and creating a fabulous world where the light and the locations were perfectly chosen. 

 

Mr. Vinterberg's direction is, as always, flawless, the actors and actresses are superb and Gabriel's character feels a little bit more iconic than in the previous movies, Bathsheba on the other hand is still as annoying as in the other versions :D (I like her though!)

 

I forgot to mention that the soundtrack is marvelous too, Craig Armstrong creating an ethereal tempo which complements the movie fantastically. 

 

Again, a really really beautiful movie that is worth the trip to the cinema! 

Have a good day!


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#5 Miguel Angel

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Posted 26 May 2015 - 05:51 PM

Just so you know there is an article on Far From The Madding Crowd in the June American Cinematographer issue which is very revealing. 

 

Have a good day! :) 


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#6 Doug Palmer

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Posted 28 May 2015 - 05:26 PM

I've just seen it in Bridport, Dorset.  A stones throw from the locations, so it was a packed cinema  (Electric Palace). I'm still not sure whether I saw a digital or film print, but whatever the Vision photography was beautiful.  Yes I thoroughly recommend everyone to see it just for the lighting and landscapes.  The forest scene was particularly well done. Re the handheld footage, I wasn't too struck on some of it later on in the film,  it looked good earlier on though.


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#7 Doug Palmer

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Posted 05 June 2015 - 03:28 AM

There is a fine line I think in any film between being aware of what the camera is doing and immersion in the film and its characters. This film passed that test. The cinematography was good but full marks also to the editing.   However, I thought the tarpaulin haystack scene wasn't particularly convincing, not enough wind and rain following.  And that shot of the corn field gleaning had far too many digital workers ;) and appeared too spacious for the period.


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