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Home-made Processing Old Emulsions


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#1 Antonio Bunt

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Posted 05 June 2015 - 10:34 PM

I got all of this film and I wonder how I can process them.
I have a good idea of how to process the Vision stock but I want to experiment with the other stocks. I have access to Lomo and G3 Morse tanks and a wide array of B&W developers and perhaps I can even get my hands on some colour developers.
Any help will be appreciated.

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#2 Simon Wyss

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Posted 06 June 2015 - 11:18 AM

Well, Antonio, you can do away all Kodachrome. That is no longer processed (to colours). The Ektachrome 160 G the same (http://photo.stackex...f-and-if-so-how).

 

Cinechrome 25 is Kodachrome 25, so neither usable.

 

The Vision2 200 Tungsten Super-8 negative film will be processed at a professional lab. For home use I recommend black-and-white film, especially for beginners. Very fun and rewarding


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#3 Antonio Bunt

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Posted 06 June 2015 - 12:25 PM

Well, I don't mind processing to B&W.
I'm far from being a beginner, I have more than 20 years into photography but I am trying to experiment even more.
Thanks for the tip!
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#4 Simon Wyss

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Posted 06 June 2015 - 01:09 PM

Fools rush in  . . .

 

You’re welcome

 

Which format are you using most?


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#5 David Cunningham

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Posted 06 June 2015 - 08:41 PM

The type G can definitely be processed color. Plattsburgh photographic can do it.

If it's the em-26 version you can even process it as E6 with mixed results. (it does have a rennet backing that would need to be removed first. ). EM - 25 can be done color but it's more expensive, harder, less like E6 and older so even less likely to not be junk.
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#6 David Cunningham

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Posted 06 June 2015 - 08:49 PM

That should be remjet. Damn auto correct on an iPhone!
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#7 Antonio Bunt

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Posted 06 June 2015 - 08:51 PM

I use Borax to grt rid of the rem-jet. I hate that step but the results look great. Since we don't have many choices on film stock over here (then again who does in this world?), we use whatever we can have handy.

Fools rush in  . . .
 
You’re welcome
 
Which format are you using most?


I am mainly using Super 8 these days. But then again, it's the stock I have handy right now.
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#8 David Cunningham

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Posted 06 June 2015 - 09:04 PM

Newer K40 from the 2000s can actually be a retry decent b&w film. Color reversal options are pretty much nil except the crappy Agfa 200D. But color negative and b&w negative and reversal super 8 are very prevail lent and easy to obtain. There is really no need to shoot old color negative or b&w.
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#9 Antonio Bunt

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Posted 06 June 2015 - 09:47 PM

Well, it is difficult to get even newer stocks in Mexico City, despite the fact its size.
Is that Agfa 200 really that crappy? I never tested it before.
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#10 Simon Wyss

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Posted 07 June 2015 - 02:07 AM

Patience, Film Ferrania is soon delivering New Scotch Chrome 100, E-6. Wittner who collaborates with the Italians can perforate to Double-8 and Double-Super-8. Super-8 derives from DS-8.


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#11 David Cunningham

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Posted 07 June 2015 - 08:11 AM

Likely the only thing You will find with the new Ferania film is better colts and higher contrast. It may actually be even grainier if the old 3M spec sheets are what we end up getting.

This all assumes Ferrania even comes through. They are struggling to get this done right now. I would not be shocked if they just disappeared all of a sudden.

The initial funding is gone. Now they're searching for more.
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#12 Richard Tuohy

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Posted 08 June 2015 - 08:38 PM

HI Antonio,

give them a go.  For the kodachrome, as you know, all you can do is black and white.  Given the very real chance of fogging on the film due to age, I think just process it as neg.  Same with the E160.  I recommend using something with a bit of punch like D19.  Have processed hundreds and hundreds of old rolls of Kodachrome as bw neg that way.  You will need to do a rem-jet removing pre-bath.  As you will for the colour neg.

Its worth doing if you have time available, but not fresh film

cheers,

richard


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#13 David Cunningham

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Posted 08 June 2015 - 11:24 PM

Again. If the e160g is the newer em-26 you can process it as e6 with decent results. Here is an example.

http://m.youtube.com...h?v=J1JsQAr3bsU
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#14 David Cunningham

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Posted 08 June 2015 - 11:26 PM

FYI. If it's the old em--25 160g some places like spectra will process as color but at a very high cost. It's not e6 compatible at all as I understand.
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#15 David Cunningham

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Posted 08 June 2015 - 11:30 PM

Last post. I promise. Based on your photo I'm 99% sure that 160g you have is the newer em-26.
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#16 Josh Gladstone

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Posted 09 June 2015 - 12:34 AM

FWIW, here's some Super 8 em-26 Ektachrome I processed in D-76:

 

 

 

Note that this cartridge was just inside a camera I'd purchased, so aside from the opening, all this footage was shot by someone else who knows when. Probably some time in the late 80s/early 90s.


Edited by Josh Gladstone, 09 June 2015 - 12:37 AM.

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#17 Phil Clark

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Posted 16 June 2015 - 07:07 AM

Just to add my $0.02 regarding DIY processing in a Lomo tank:

 

I've successfully processed 1990s K40 Kodachrome as both BW neg and BW reversal - results were okay if a bit murky - it's possibly worth doing if you can pick the stock up cheap or free. Older Kodachrome (eg the K II on the right of  your pic) I'd use as leader - it's not worth the effort IME.

 

The Vision2 is an earlier version of the currently available Vision3 stock and can be processed as C41 if you want to do it yourself. Otherwise there are pro labs who will do it in ECN (its native chemistry) for a fee. Bear in mind this is a colour neg stock and not reversal.

 

greets from London  


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#18 Duncan Peters

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Posted 19 June 2015 - 09:43 AM

Hello, i am a photographer from toronto interested in shooting on film stocks, which is why i joined the forum !

 

you can process the vision in c41 chemicals, which you can make from scratch if you are able to find all the chemicals, it really isnt that hard and can be put together at room temp. bh photo also sells a power c41 press kit which has gotten good reviews but i am able to get the liquid concentrates where i am. i do not know if you would be able to get the powder kit sent to where you are.

 

also you can remove the remjet with only baking soda and very hot water, 1 tablespoon / litre, make enough to do 5 or 6 washes, shake vigorously and keep going until the water is clear.

 

for the kodachrome you process k14 or b&w, BUT k14 doesnt exist anymore.

 

you cannot cross process the film with c41, kodachrome does not have any dye couplers in the emulsion. the k14 process adds the color.

 

kodacrhome was hard enough to process that kodak included the processing when you purchased the roll.


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#19 Duncan Peters

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Posted 19 June 2015 - 11:16 AM

just want to add i in no way recommend mixing c41 from scratch unless you know exactly what you are doing and how to safely handle what you are working with.

 

the bh photo kit is the same thing and its already weighed out, mixed and ready to be added to water.


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#20 Antonio Bunt

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Posted 22 June 2015 - 10:05 PM

Sorry, I was away for a while!
The great thing about questions is the fact that more questions rise and more knowledge can be shared!

HI Antonio,
give them a go.  For the kodachrome, as you know, all you can do is black and white.  Given the very real chance of fogging on the film due to age, I think just process it as neg.  Same with the E160.  I recommend using something with a bit of punch like D19.  Have processed hundreds and hundreds of old rolls of Kodachrome as bw neg that way.  You will need to do a rem-jet removing pre-bath.  As you will for the colour neg.
Its worth doing if you have time available, but not fresh film
cheers,
richard


Nice to read you over here, Richard! We don't have D-19 anymore in Mexico.
Do you think I can use HC-110 instead?

Last post. I promise. Based on your photo I'm 99% sure that 160g you have is the newer em-26.


It is indeed the newer EM-26 process.

FWIW, here's some Super 8 em-26 Ektachrome I processed in D-76:
 
http://www.youtube.c...h?v=RmN-9aHgrbs
 
 
Note that this cartridge was just inside a camera I'd purchased, so aside from the opening, all this footage was shot by someone else who knows when. Probably some time in the late 80s/early 90s.


Hey Josh! Did you transfer the film with your set-up featured in another thread? It looks cool!

Just to add my $0.02 regarding DIY processing in a Lomo tank:
 
I've successfully processed 1990s K40 Kodachrome as both BW neg and BW reversal - results were okay if a bit murky - it's possibly worth doing if you can pick the stock up cheap or free. Older Kodachrome (eg the K II on the right of  your pic) I'd use as leader - it's not worth the effort IME.
 
The Vision2 is an earlier version of the currently available Vision3 stock and can be processed as C41 if you want to do it yourself. Otherwise there are pro labs who will do it in ECN (its native chemistry) for a fee. Bear in mind this is a colour neg stock and not reversal.
 
greets from London


So you recommend just using the KII as leader and not even bother on tests?
Have you ever used e Flexicolor kit to process Vison colour neg?
It is what I have handy right now.
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