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How has this shot been lit?


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#1 Charlie Manton

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Posted 24 June 2015 - 01:13 PM

How has this shot been lit?

Thanks!


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#2 Charlie Manton

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Posted 24 June 2015 - 01:16 PM

Shot attached.

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  • Fight-Club-fight-club-4646800-1706-960.jpg

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#3 Tim Tyler

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Posted 24 June 2015 - 01:37 PM

The facial shadows seem to indicate a small, slightly diffused overhead source between the lens and her face.

 

Probably the same for the background but not quite centered.


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#4 Charlie Manton

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Posted 24 June 2015 - 01:41 PM

Thanks Tim.

 

Would you think something like a mini Kino Flo would have been used for the face? Definitely Fluorescent?

 

The lamp in the background is a standard tungsten bulb?

 

Apart from those two lights do you think there is anything else lighting this scene?

 

Thanks 


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#5 Tim Tyler

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Posted 24 June 2015 - 01:47 PM

The image looks like it been graded heavily so I can't guess at color temp, It's possible the entire shot was lit with a couple of 60W bulbs plus the practical light.

 

Might be a small Kino source in the foreground but I'd guess a diffused fresnel or even just a soft bare bulb with some diffusion. 

 

Why do you ask?


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#6 Charlie Manton

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Posted 24 June 2015 - 02:03 PM

Thanks! Am wanting to do something similar to this and just wanted some advice etc. 


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#7 David Mullen ASC

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Posted 24 June 2015 - 06:29 PM

Probably a Kinoflo (not a Mini Flo though) or a paper lantern. Keep in mind that it's a slo-mo shot so needs enough light for running the camera faster.
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#8 Tim Tyler

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Posted 24 June 2015 - 06:41 PM

What's the shot from?


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#9 David Mullen ASC

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Posted 24 June 2015 - 07:23 PM

Fight Club
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#10 Tyler Purcell

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Posted 24 June 2015 - 07:53 PM

Yea kino for sure, there is a lot of kino in Fight Club. Notice the guy sitting in the background, he's got light on his head as well. So there was a lot more going in that shot then meets the eye. I thought Jeff did a fantastic job with Fight Club, his first big narrative film, having been a camera operator for Fincher on The Game and Seven previously. Photochemical finish as well, so kudos' for making such a stylistic look in-camera. Fincher pushed the format to it's limits for sure, hence the reason he shoots digital today. 


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#11 Tim Tyler

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Posted 24 June 2015 - 08:26 PM

Of course. Thought it looked familiar, darker than I recall though. Amazing looking film, especially given the lack of digital post. Wasn't it Fight Club and Saving Private Ryan that started the bleach bypass trend?


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#12 Bill DiPietra

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Posted 24 June 2015 - 08:33 PM

Of course. Thought it looked familiar, darker than I recall though. Amazing looking film, especially given the lack of digital post. Wasn't it Fight Club and Saving Private Ryan that started the bleach bypass trend?

 

I thought Se7en was the very first to do that...


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#13 Tim Tyler

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Posted 24 June 2015 - 08:48 PM

Right.

 

I saw Se7en on opening night in a packed theater in Hollywood. Had no idea what I was getting into. 


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#14 Tyler Purcell

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Posted 24 June 2015 - 09:30 PM

Seven is one of my favorite photographed films. When it came out, I was just a teenager and was blown away with the look. Khondji pushed it even further with Panic Room, which pushed the limits of grain and black levels on 35mm to a level I had never seen before. I'm personally not a fan of underexposing like that, but it left a lasting impression on me and opened my mind to what was acceptable. 

 

It's unfortunate true pieces of cinematic art like Seven, don't get the credit they deserve in the main stream awards. 

 

Ohh and yes, I believe Seven was the first to make a hand-full of bleach bypass prints. 


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#15 David Mullen ASC

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Posted 24 June 2015 - 10:27 PM

Silver retention printing dates back to around the early 1980's with the ENR prints for "Reds" and the skip-bleach prints for "1984", but I've heard that some Japanese film tried it in the 1960's.
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#16 David Mullen ASC

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Posted 24 June 2015 - 10:30 PM

https://en.m.wikiped...i/Bleach_bypass

Bleach bypass was first used in Japanese filmmaker Kon Ichikawa's 1960 film Her Brother. Kazuo Miyagawa as Daiei Motion Picture Company's cameraman invented bleach bypass for Ichikawa's film,[1][2][3] inspired by the color rendition in the 1956 release of Moby-Dick, printed using Technicolor, and was achieved through the use of an additional black and white overlay. Despite this early foray into the technique, it remained overlooked for the most part until its use by Roger Deakins in 1984.


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#17 Satsuki Murashige

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Posted 24 June 2015 - 11:35 PM

I though Khondji and Conrad Hall Jr. shared credit on Panic Room? Wonder what the story was behind that. Still my favorite reference for low-key ambient night interior.
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#18 Tyler Purcell

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Posted 25 June 2015 - 01:39 AM

Cool stuff David, thanks for posting that. I didn't know other hollywood films had experimented with it before. 

 

On the "Seven" Criterion Laserdisc liner notes, they mention using a bleach bypass print to make the HD master. It looks entirely different then the overly clean, green/blue tinted DVD and BluRay produced by Criterion much later in time. 

 

As a side note, it's amazing to see the movie ON film. I had an opportunity to see it projected in 35mm last year and it still blows my mind away at how well it was made for a photochemical film. 


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#19 Tyler Purcell

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Posted 25 June 2015 - 01:47 AM

I though Khondji and Conrad Hall Jr. shared credit on Panic Room? Wonder what the story was behind that. Still my favorite reference for low-key ambient night interior.

 

There was a re-shoot after Foster had her pregnancy and I think Khondji was already booked on another shoot and couldn't come back, so Conrad Hall Jr stepped in and finished the re-shoots. 


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#20 Stuart Brereton

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Posted 25 June 2015 - 03:14 AM

 

There was a re-shoot after Foster had her pregnancy and I think Khondji was already booked on another shoot and couldn't come back, so Conrad Hall Jr stepped in and finished the re-shoots. 

 

Another version of the story is that Khondji was removed after falling out with Jodie Foster, and yet another version has it that he quit after arguing with Fincher about the lack of creative input he had, due to the entire movie having been pre-visualized.


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