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My diploma film is on the 2nd and I need advice


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#1 Hrishikesh Jha

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Posted 26 June 2015 - 08:49 AM

Hey guys.

 

First and foremost thank you from the bottom of my heart for the advice you gave me on my other thread(Horrible first day at shoot), I have learnt a lot and will put them into practice.

 

My course is coming to an end and I am getting the top prizes for all my films. They have asked me what the secret is but all I can say is I follow old school aesthetics and only watch older films which I feel had more characterization and depth of character. Unlike my fellow directors I spend time studying cinematography(although my DOP and I dont get along much, I am more Soy Cuba he is more Avengers).

 

My final diploma film is for 10 minutes(give or take) and I have chosen Virginia Woolf's The haunting as my story. A couple lives in a mansion and they are haunted by a ghost couple, except its melodrama and not horror. The ghost couple seek something....and throughout the story they open doors, open drawers and are seeking something. In the end it is revealed that they are seeking love....heart in the flame. 

 

I am getting a massive 18th century mansion set piece to shoot. Its an overnight shoot(time constraints are 10pm to 6am) and my script has been well received by staff and my actors. 

 

We are shooting on a P2 camera: https://www.google.c...oBQ#q=p2 camera

 

Now...this is a mood piece. I wrote it in my mission statement that first and foremost I want this to be a mood piece, a sensual audio/visual short focusing more on these features than dialogue or even story.

I have my audio files in cue but visually I am a bit scared.

 

I don't want to use VFX to show the ghostly figures. Instead I am using fish eye lens to show their first person POV. Our leads will see nothing but interact looking in their direction. It was tough to convince my teachers who thought I better use some VFX or chroma. I didn't like that.

 

Now what about lighting and look. I want a gothic feel, a darkish look except the lamps and the dress of the female lead which will be bright red and green in two scenes. The look is very important to me.

 

Can you give some advice. My DOP faculty is just looking to wrap up shoot. When I asked for fish eye lens they plain refused so I have to rent it that day(100 dollars). I am driven, I want to get the best knowledge and I  can get some help from you guys.

 

What would be good angles. What would be good lighting to create that mood. How can I leave an impression visually in those 10 minutes?

Thanks in advance. I will keep chipping in, unlike last time. Any questions and ask me.

 

 

 

 


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#2 Simon Wyss

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Posted 26 June 2015 - 08:59 AM

There is nothing I can tell you except that you should separate the paranthesis by spaces.


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#3 Bill DiPietra

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Posted 26 June 2015 - 09:15 AM

Now what about lighting and look. I want a gothic feel, a darkish look except the lamps and the dress of the female lead which will be bright red and green in two scenes. The look is very important to me.

 

Seems like dimmers might be useful in certain scenes.  But as you said, you're driven.  Which means only you can/should come up with the look.  It sounds like you have been on the right track from the beginning, so just keep following your artistic instincts.


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#4 Hrishikesh Jha

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Posted 26 June 2015 - 09:37 AM

 

Seems like dimmers might be useful in certain scenes.  But as you said, you're driven.  Which means only you can/should come up with the look.  It sounds like you have been on the right track from the beginning, so just keep following your artistic instincts.

 

Thanks for that. I don't know the technical names of such and such lights. Dimmers...thanks. I will look it up.


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#5 Bill DiPietra

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Posted 26 June 2015 - 10:02 AM

Dimmers can go from very basic models to very involved ones.  They connect to the lights and you can dim or "fade" the intensity of the light up or down.  Robert Richardson, ASC has used them a lot on the films he's worked on.  The reason people tend to avoid them is because they obviously create a shift in color temperature as you vary the intensity.  But if it's something you can work with, they can produce really dramatic effects as long as they're not over-used.

 

I have two basic, knob-controlled 1K dimmers like this: http://www.ebay.com/...=item53ddc02896


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