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Checking (a bad) Telecine transfer from 16mm


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#1 Lili Chin

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Posted 27 June 2015 - 11:42 PM

Hi all, 

 

So I have 2 questions - it's in regards to being dissatisfied with a telecine transfer from a post house and wondering if there is a way to check the scopes using Da Vinci Resolve Lite at home. 

 

Problem 1: 

 

16mm xfer to 2K scan > The colorist gave my my film but didn't time it so initially gave me an ungraded file. (it's the picture on the left) then he realized his mistake and graded it (from the scan he gave me which was ungraded) and pulled the blacks to 0 and the whites to 100. It looks aweful in my opinion, and puts black particles in the film. So I am trying to figure out if he introduced noise into the picture while doing the final color correct. I checked the 16mm print and it doesn't have these dark values in the grain structure. I will say the film was a little fogged and slightly overexposed / underexposed to begin with (I am an experimental filmmaker) but I dont think it should have such dark values in the grain. See the ungraded and it looks okay. So I am trying to figure out if I can determine if he pushed a button and accidentally added noise into this picture. The final product will be both 16mm film (scan from file) and 2K. 

 

I will post Problem 2 in a different post since the image will be too large. 

 

Thanks so much

lili

 

 

 

 


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#2 Lili Chin

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Posted 28 June 2015 - 12:03 AM

Sorry I didn't manage to upload the image - here it is now. 

 

Left is the ungraded, right is the graded. It's a low resolution image due to the limitations, please email me if you want a better quality image. 

Thanks 

Lili 

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#3 Robert Houllahan

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Posted 28 June 2015 - 01:45 PM

It looks like there are a few things going on here, the shot looks overexposed and I assume it's a negative stock which means the film itself is probably pretty dense.

 

This puts your hilites more into the shadow range of the sensor used in the scanner. Digital sensors are typically noisy in the shadow area and adding contrast will bring that noise out. I see that the flat image has allot of grain and not much contrast, I find that when I scan B&W in Log it is usually more contrasty than the left shot.

 

I also think the scanner is maybe a original Spirit? or was not oversampled i.e. a 2K scan scanned at 2K sensor area in the scanner which causes the grain to be not as finely resolved and therefore more chunky. More modern scanners over-sample a 2K scan by a factor of 1.5-2 or more which more finely resolves the grain structure.

 

B&W stocks can be challenging to scan especially if there is a range of over and under exposure within the same roll, it could be that the scan was setup to a middle range which will cause some shots to be pushed more into the shadow range of the scanner sensor (like above) and other more into the hilite area.

 

A multi-flash HDR scan may help to capture the density range of the film better.


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#4 David Mullen ASC

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Posted 28 June 2015 - 05:04 PM

Sharpening can also make the grain more prominent.


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#5 Robert Houllahan

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Posted 28 June 2015 - 10:02 PM

Yeah the graded shot does have an over sharpened look to it IMO.


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