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bad sorce light vs high quality lights


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#1 marcelo kron

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Posted 30 June 2015 - 06:05 PM

Hi guys!

I'm about to start a cooking tv program and the production house has already some cool lights (I think day are Philips) 

 

As we know is hard to get nice colors from this kind of "generic" lights.

 

I know there is a lot of graphics and lights spectrums etc... but for a layperson is hard to understand... 

I wonder if there is  some information or some photos or anything that a layperson could understand the principles of a good light source.

 

do you guys think this exist? where can I find? 

 

thank you!!

 


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#2 AJ Young

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Posted 30 June 2015 - 09:43 PM

Marcelo,

 

You'll be able to find numerous resources on the internet for lighting techniques (3 point lighting, quality of light, exposure, etc). There may be some infographics available that you can find through http://images.google.com, but I don't know any off the top of my head.

 

Unfortunately, learning how to light well takes time and isn't something easily learned from a simple infographic. There are tons of great texts to read on lighting. This book, by Blain Brown, is becoming a classic at US film schools.

 

My suggestion is to always approach a lighting set up thinking, "What do I want my lighting to mean?" In other words, you'll have to research and find reasons for how you want your image to look. I recommend looking at how other cooking shows look. Does it look/feel like a happy location? Is it natural or stage like? Does it resemble a cinematic film or more like a morning talk show? Figure out what kind of cooking show your producers are wanting.

 

You essentially have to find the why before the how. Knowing why you're making these decisions will easily guide you on how to execute them. Once you know why you want your show to look like certain cooking shows, you then research how those cooking shows look. Ask questions like: Is it low contrast? Hard or soft light? Evenly lit across the entire scene? Naturally lit or theatrical?

 

Finally, don't get caught up in gear talk. The audience and camera don't care what lights you used, but how you used them. Correct me if I'm wrong, but the film Ida was shot with basically a three light kit and it looks brilliant.

 

It's all about planning, research, and making decisions on why you want your image to look a certain way before you figure out how to do it.


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#3 Mihnea Snooker

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Posted 01 July 2015 - 03:54 AM

 Correct me if I'm wrong, but the film Ida was shot with basically a three light kit and it looks brilliant.

There were used much more than a three light kit (there were dedos, HMIs, Kinos, tungsten) but it looks brilliant indeed.


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