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"Steve Jobs"


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#1 Gregory Irwin

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Posted 01 July 2015 - 11:52 PM

I'm personally looking forward to this movie!!!

 

https://www.youtube....h?v=aEr6K1bwIVs

 

G


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#2 Miguel Angel

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Posted 02 July 2015 - 09:52 AM

As a former high level Apple employee I look forward to seeing it too! 

The trailer was magnificently focused and sharp! :D 

Have a good day! 


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#3 Satsuki Murashige

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Posted 03 July 2015 - 02:00 AM

Woah, that was quick. Looks great Greg, congrats!
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#4 Bill DiPietra

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Posted 03 July 2015 - 08:53 AM

Hey Greg.  Looks very nice.  I noticed a number of shots that looked a bit grainy and then I saw that some of the footage was shot on 16mm!  Pretty cool.

 

Can you talk about how you guys came to that decision?...


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#5 Gregory Irwin

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Posted 04 July 2015 - 11:09 AM

Hey Greg.  Looks very nice.  I noticed a number of shots that looked a bit grainy and then I saw that some of the footage was shot on 16mm!  Pretty cool.

 

Can you talk about how you guys came to that decision?...

Since we all have to sign a NDA, I can't speak much about the movie till it's out. What I can say Bill, is that we matched 3 different  formats to reflect 3 different time periods.  It will be a wonderful picture.

 

G


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#6 Bill DiPietra

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Posted 04 July 2015 - 05:25 PM

Since we all have to sign a NDA, I can't speak much about the movie till it's out. What I can say Bill, is that we matched 3 different  formats to reflect 3 different time periods.  It will be a wonderful picture.

 

G

 

Got it!  Thanks, Greg.  Looks like one to see in the theater.


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#7 Mareena Baron

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Posted 14 November 2015 - 04:01 AM

Thanks Greg.  Looks awesome. Congrats man. 


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#8 Phil Connolly

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Posted 23 November 2015 - 11:01 AM

I thought it was great - the approach was tricky but all involved really pulled it of. Great performances and Sorkins script reminded me a lot of what I like about David Mamet. 

 

The direction was really assured and found lots of ways to keep it visually interesting as for the most part its a series of 2(mostly) and 3 hander conversations in a confined location(s). I do hope that it does find an audience, maybe its something that will pick up on video if word of mouth is good. 


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#9 Bill DiPietra

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Posted 24 November 2015 - 08:15 PM

Since I saw it was disappearing form all but one NYC theater tomorrow, I finally went to see this on the big screen today and it was well worth it.  I really liked the way different formats were used to depict different periods in Steve Jobs' life (especially the first act in 16mm!)  I was immediately pulled in by the performances and Aaron Sorkin's writing (not always my favorite) was right on point.  Very interesting "three-act" structure.  I've never been a big Danny Boyle fan, but his direction was excellent - not overdone or muddled with unnecessary technique.  He wisely let the performances do the job.  Just a very effective film and I highly recommend it.

 

Congrats, Greg!


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#10 Gregory Irwin

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Posted 25 November 2015 - 08:37 AM

Since I saw it was disappearing form all but one NYC theater tomorrow, I finally went to see this on the big screen today and it was well worth it.  I really liked the way different formats were used to depict different periods in Steve Jobs' life (especially the first act in 16mm!)  I was immediately pulled in by the performances and Aaron Sorkin's writing (not always my favorite) was right on point.  Very interesting "three-act" structure.  I've never been a big Danny Boyle fan, but his direction was excellent - not overdone or muddled with unnecessary technique.  He wisely let the performances do the job.  Just a very effective film and I highly recommend it.
 
Congrats, Greg!


Thank you Bill. It's too bad that JOBS never gained any traction. It's a wonderful picture and all of us involved are very proud of it. This goes to show how finicky audiences can be without the informed perception. I'm glad you enjoyed it. Everyone I've spoken to really liked it. Let's see if the awards season can help it's potential.

G
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#11 Bill DiPietra

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Posted 25 November 2015 - 10:40 AM

Thank you Bill. It's too bad that JOBS never gained any traction. It's a wonderful picture and all of us involved are very proud of it. This goes to show how finicky audiences can be without the informed perception. I'm glad you enjoyed it. Everyone I've spoken to really liked it. Let's see if the awards season can help it's potential.

G

 

Yeah, I just recently leaned that the box office earnings weren't what was expected and I found that surprising.  I have a feeling it may be a bigger hit with the On-Demand/DVD crowd once it comes around to that circle.

 

I'd be very surprised if at least Michael Fassbender & Danny Boyle didn't earn some nominations.  That must have been an electric set to work on with all those great performances.


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#12 David Cunningham

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Posted 25 November 2015 - 05:48 PM

I think it was because everyone thinks they already know everything there is to know about Steve jobs. There have been many movies and documentaries already, so even a jobs fan like myself never made the time to take in this movie... And I'm a huge celluloid guy. I just wasn't feeling a jobs movie. I will definitely watch the blu Ray when it comes out if for no other reason than the cinematography.
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#13 Satsuki Murashige

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Posted 29 November 2015 - 07:25 PM

Finally just saw 'Jobs' and thought it was great! Wonderful work by the camera and G&E crews. Some of the Steadicam operating in tight spaces was incredible, spinning and stopping on a dime with no correction, tilting up 50 degrees and panning 90 degrees while following actors going up stairs. Don't know how you pulled focus on some of those shots Greg! Loved the mixed use of formats, thought it worked really well. Some great frames and use of Dutch angles. My favorite scene was the boardroom quorum night interior with the rain.

Greg, I'm interested to hear you thoughts on working with film as you've done for most of your career and now the Alexa. Beyond personal preference, is there anything that you've noticed technically in the look that can't be 'added in post' now that you've gone back and forth, and also any differences in your own personal workflow? Do you find yourself using a monitor more with Alexa?
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#14 Gregory Irwin

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Posted 30 November 2015 - 03:09 PM

Finally just saw 'Jobs' and thought it was great! Wonderful work by the camera and G&E crews. Some of the Steadicam operating in tight spaces was incredible, spinning and stopping on a dime with no correction, tilting up 50 degrees and panning 90 degrees while following actors going up stairs. Don't know how you pulled focus on some of those shots Greg! Loved the mixed use of formats, thought it worked really well. Some great frames and use of Dutch angles. My favorite scene was the boardroom quorum night interior with the rain.
Greg, I'm interested to hear you thoughts on working with film as you've done for most of your career and now the Alexa. Beyond personal preference, is there anything that you've noticed technically in the look that can't be 'added in post' now that you've gone back and forth, and also any differences in your own personal workflow? Do you find yourself using a monitor more with Alexa?


First of all, thank you Sat. Very kind words and very good observations. Geoff Haley, the A camera operator and the steadicam operator is simply the best in the business. I can't count how many shots he has done where movie people would swear we were on a dolly and it was steadicam. He's just that good. He authored a wonderful article in the SOC magazine about his experience on SJ. I highly recommend reading it.

As for SJ, over 80% of the movie is Steadicam. We would literally run distances of 1/4 mile through the hallways and corridors, in and out of elevators on a continuous shot. Usually seeing 360 degrees as well. Geoff was a Titan for being able to withstand that physical abuse. When we were shooting the 16mm and the 35mm formats, I was right in the scrum of it all pivoting and dancing my way through all of the obstacles while pulling focus. Not only did we have the cast members navigating their way through very narrow spaces but we would have the Steadicam operator, the dolly grip guiding him, the boom man, an electrician holding up a panel light, myself and at times another grip guiding me! It would get a bit manic as we spun around 360 degrees and for Geoff and myself trying to remember all of the dialogue cues to pan and rack focus on the fly. It was very challenging to say the least. On the Alexa, I used a combination of pulling focus off of a monitor and the old school way of being at the camera. We shot the entire movie at a T2. With the the Alexa, there were many times I needed the monitor to discern focus between eyelashes or eyeballs. It was common to Steadicam with the 75mm or the 100mm Master Prime lenses and at a T2, the depth of field was incredibly shallow.

As for the three formats and their looks Sat, maybe you can recreate the grain and lower resolution of the 16mm vs. the 35mm formats in post but you can't recreate one of the unexpected intangibles that we experienced. The differing shapes, sizes and weights of the various cameras used photographing SJ definitely contributed to varying camera operating styles. Flying an Arri 416 which is lighter and smaller than the Arri LT or the Alexa, allowed Geoff to get into smaller spaces and operate with a much lighter hand. The visuals of the different formats with regards to the operating are subtle but they are there.

One final note, we all kept track of how far we would walk/run inside of the San Fracisco Opera House which was one of our more complicated locations, on pedometers. We would average around 9 miles per day and on a couple of days, we exceeded 12 miles! We were all in great shape after SJ!

G
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#15 Satsuki Murashige

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Posted 30 November 2015 - 04:11 PM

Very cool, thanks for the inside info! I know the maze under the Opera House well from my days as a ballet student doing the Nutcracker year after year. Very easy to get lost down there, it's like being inside an enormous submarine.
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#16 Gregory Irwin

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Posted 30 November 2015 - 07:01 PM

Here is the link to the SOC's magazine that has the STEVE JOBS article.  Enjoy...

 

http://issuu.com/cam...cs/co-fall-2015

 

G


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#17 Satsuki Murashige

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Posted 01 December 2015 - 05:49 PM

Awesome, thanks again Greg!
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#18 Manu Delpech

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Posted 22 February 2016 - 04:49 PM

Rewatched it on BR and I'm kind of blown away this didn't get nominated for best cinematography, such a gorgeous film. The super 16 footage is the best I've ever seen, so sharp ! I even wondered if the scene where Steve & Woz step outside the building to walk around in daylight was 35 mm, I found the grain to really be non intrusive especially considering that the whole first act is shot on the 7219 stock. Seriously, it's stunning, and then, stepping into the 2nd act with the elegance and richness of 3 perf 35 mm, phew. I'm kinda glad Fincher didn't do the film, we would never have had that brilliant 16 mm, 35 mm and Alexa structure. Wonderful job to all involved, you killed it, Alwin Kuchler, you've been robbed.


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#19 Gregory Irwin

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Posted 23 February 2016 - 07:35 PM

Rewatched it on BR and I'm kind of blown away this didn't get nominated for best cinematography, such a gorgeous film. The super 16 footage is the best I've ever seen, so sharp ! I even wondered if the scene where Steve & Woz step outside the building to walk around in daylight was 35 mm, I found the grain to really be non intrusive especially considering that the whole first act is shot on the 7219 stock. Seriously, it's stunning, and then, stepping into the 2nd act with the elegance and richness of 3 perf 35 mm, phew. I'm kinda glad Fincher didn't do the film, we would never have had that brilliant 16 mm, 35 mm and Alexa structure. Wonderful job to all involved, you killed it, Alwin Kuchler, you've been robbed.

 

Alwin is one talented guy! His gaffer, Len Levine also deserves a MVP award for what he accomplished.  Due to the San Francisco Ballet being in season, we couldn't leave ANYTHING out or rigged while the Ballet was in performance.  Thus Len figured out how to hide all of the lights and cable, along with all of the associated rigging so we wouldn't have to start over each day.  What a huge difference that made.  SJ is a wonderful picture.

 

G


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#20 Giray Izcan

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Posted 23 February 2016 - 09:52 PM

Gregory, first of all congratulations with your recent achievements. Secondly, do you remember how you the DP rated the 16 film stocks? Overexposed, or exposed normally? I'm just curious. Thank you.


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