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Shooting with Mini35Digital-Adapter


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#1 Alex Fuchs

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Posted 19 May 2005 - 11:27 AM

Hi dudes,
I will shot an short film in an few weeks and I decided to shot with an Canon XL2 in 25p /16:9 modus with manual white balance. The location is an long hotel corridor with many neon-lights on the ceiling and over the doors. Now I have two problems:
1) It's the first time I use the P+S-adapter so I don't really know (cause I shot only DV-formats) what lenses I should take. I decide for some PL-mount Zeiss lenses with T 1.3 (18, 35, 50, maybe 80).
2) The hotel manager don't let us work at the lightning, that means I can't built in some flos etc. on the ceiling. What lightning setting would work? I have no idea. Maybe I use one 4bank-flo on the dolly but than the frame will lost some depth. Maybe I can bounce some light in the corridor from the camera angle.
What can I do? (It's the same location as the attachted picture)
Thanks for help
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#2 David Mullen ASC

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Posted 19 May 2005 - 12:48 PM

18, 35, 50, maybe 80.

If you're used to working with a zoom lens on DV, it can be hard to work with a limited number of prime lenses but it can be done. Personally, 18 to 80mm should cover you in most situations inside except maybe ECU's (which can be done with an 80mm, maybe with a diopter, but you will be awfully close to the subject.) 80mm is a good lens for close-ups in general, especially in small rooms.

You probably will want a 25mm between the 18mm and 35mm.

You may want a 100mm or a 90mm macro lens for inserts. At least carry some diopters.

As for lighting a hallway, that's ALWAYS a pain in the a---...

Best solution -- find a hallway you can light more easily. Or light it by opening doors and having the light spill out from the rooms. There are limits to frontal lighting for a hallway, plus it doesn't look very good.
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#3 Alex Fuchs

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Posted 19 May 2005 - 04:09 PM

thanks david,
but what is with the lens-speed. I decide to take the Zeiss T1.3 because there is very low light and the p+s adapter takes me 2 stops. Is my decision right? what is with the T2.0 primes? I think the combination of p+s-adapter plus a zoom lens will not work because of the low light situation. maybe I can put some lights in the hidden corner of the doors, the part we don't see in frame, but so I have no chance to light from the top to the ground (I marked it in the picture). Very difficult, but I have to work with that location.

Edited by Alex Fuchs, 19 May 2005 - 04:15 PM.

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#4 David Mullen ASC

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Posted 19 May 2005 - 06:57 PM

You can always stop down a Super-Speed lens anyway, so getting T/1.3 lenses was probably a good idea. Recording to Mini-DV in SD resolution, I can't imagine any benefit from using a modern T/2.0 lens like a Cooke S4 anyway.
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