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Prof. Quality Vid on a Budget


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#1 FilmmakerJack

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Posted 19 May 2005 - 05:11 PM

1. Hey, I'm a 16mm hobbyist looking to go video on longer projects. Because I spend so much on 16mm, I don't have much for a dvcam. Does anyone have any suggestions as to what the "good" cameras are for a budget of 500-800? I'm looking to get a mic and matte box seperately. What are my options for trying to get professional quality video on a small budget?

2. I had heard a new line of panasonic 3ccd cams were headed to hit the consumer market soon. Any chance this will start a bigger buz and start other companies to release 3ccd for cheap?
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#2 drew_town

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Posted 19 May 2005 - 05:18 PM

500-800 dollars?
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#3 Ryan Puckett

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Posted 19 May 2005 - 05:29 PM

I've got a book on alchemy around here somewhere...*rifles through desk*
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#4 FilmmakerJack

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Posted 19 May 2005 - 05:34 PM

Dollars is correct, sir.
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#5 Tom Wills

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Posted 19 May 2005 - 05:54 PM

500-800 dollars will get you a good 1ccd camera. If you can live with having to work more to create good shots, it should be fine. Sure, it's not gonna be great, but if you can shoot 16mm and have it look good you can shoot this and make it look good too. I'm thinking a Canon would be right for you. Incredible lenses, great CCD blocks, and small and light enough to take anywhere. I'd recommend getting good support equipment though. A good shoulder support and tripod are worth their weight in gold with these small cameras. Your arms and picture will thank you later. :P

Good luck venturing into the world of DV. :)
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#6 Rik Andino

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Posted 19 May 2005 - 06:48 PM

I would push for 800 bucks if not a grand.

Eitherways search for used cameras
You could probably find the Sony VX1000 for that price...
It's the first 3ccd miniDV camera...It's around 8 years old
But it's better than any consumer camera you could get for that price range

Other than that look for used Sony PD100--or PD150
Or maybe a used Canon XL1

But there's not much in terms of professional quality video for that price

If you really want a good video camera save up a bit more...
You'll probably start finding a used DVX100 for around $1,500US
Look for it around the time Panasonic releases it new HVX200.



Good Luck
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#7 FilmmakerJack

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Posted 19 May 2005 - 08:39 PM

I was thinking of getting a used Panasonic PV-GS400. Any advice? Would I still want to matte box it?
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#8 Tom Wills

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Posted 19 May 2005 - 08:59 PM

I played with the GS-400 in B&H. Wasn't too impressed. Really, it didn't look much nicer than my Canon in terms of quality. The colors weren't at all different, and it had a little more quality, but nothing really noticible. I'd say if you want to go 3CCD, go for a tried and true model. You are plunking down a somewhat sizable amount of cash up front, without even knowing all of this, so you want something that you can know will work and won't have the first generation bugs. Try and go prosumer, but if you can't, go for as good of a consumer camera as you can get. Also, if you can, try and go to either B&H or a place like it, where you can get your hands on the cameras and feel their controls, look at their pictures, and test it all. That's a quite important part of buying a new camera.
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#9 Rik Andino

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Posted 19 May 2005 - 09:25 PM

Well that's a good consumer DV cameras
It's got 3CCDs
And a couple of manual options...
It's Panasonic's top of the line consumer camera
(Unless you consider the DVX100 a consumer camera)

Check it out and if you like it get it...

You can try shooting some good footage with it...
You can shoot good footage with almost any camera
It just depends on your skills

But the GS400 will give you enough freedom to do what you want...
And if it's all you can afford well...


Good Luck
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#10 drew_town

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Posted 19 May 2005 - 09:50 PM

My suggestion would be to take whatever money you plan on spending on a matte box and mic and put it toward a better camera. Here's my suggestion of cameras in order and what you could expect to pay for a used one:

Canon XL1s $2100
Panasonic DVX100 $2000
Sony PD-150 $1900
Canon XL1 $1700
Sony VX2000 $1600
Sony VX1000 $1100
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#11 Sam Wells

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Posted 20 May 2005 - 07:49 AM

Jeez you've got a HDV camera available in July with a street price of what $1600 maybe ?
Under $2000. I'd take a look. No it's not a Cine Alta but so what ? Something to try things with, learn things with.

-Sam
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#12 Jason M Silverman

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Posted 21 May 2005 - 09:23 AM

Hey,

Does the Mini-DV format have enough resolution for professional work in your guys' opinion? I love the Canon XL2, but am worried that the mini-DV format might not hold up well if the documentary I'm planning gets put onto 35. I'm not sure which will cost more-- buying a DVcam or the extra work the mini-DV might take to look better when transfered?? Opinions?

I'm generally a fan of film myself (my other projects have been super-8 and super-16), but this budget and type of film calls for video, but I would like to aim for cinema distribution.


Peace

Jason
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#13 Phil Rhodes

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Posted 21 May 2005 - 09:51 AM

Hi,

I do professonal work on DV format all the time, but with a slightly more high-end camera than what's being discussed here.

Phil
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#14 David Mullen ASC

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Posted 21 May 2005 - 10:08 AM

There have been plenty of DV documentaries distributed on 35mm; "Spellbound", shot on a consumer DV camera (Canon XL1 I think) even got an Oscar nomination... it may have even won, I can't remember. The quality is secondary to content when you're talking about a documentary.
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#15 Jason M Silverman

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Posted 21 May 2005 - 10:29 AM

There have been plenty of DV documentaries distributed on 35mm; "Spellbound", shot on a consumer DV camera (Canon XL1 I think) even got an Oscar nomination... it may have even won, I can't remember.  The quality is secondary to content when you're talking about a documentary.

<{POST_SNAPBACK}>


thanks for the comments. I won't feel too bad about the DV quality then. Anyone have experience with the wide-angle lense which Canon makes for it (XL2)?

Peace

Jason Silverman
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