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Canon 814E, Kodak 50D Film, Looks very dull


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#1 HarleyD Hill-Richmond

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Posted 13 July 2015 - 01:25 PM

Hello

I recently got my first super 8 camera and shot two rolls of Kodak 50D Film.

I got the film back and it looks very dull indeed.

Most of the time I was filming in bright daylight with auto exposure. No shutter adjustment and no filter screw in the top of the camera.

 

Here is a link to a bit of the footage.

In the video I've followed up each clip with a contrast adjusted clip that I did to make it look a bit nicer.

 

At first I thought the camera might be overexposing the film but it doesn't have that bright white look.

Could it be a developing or telecine issue? I got it all done at the same place and while these guys aren't a big lab, they seem to have some reasonable results up on youtube.

Also, the film went through hand/carry-on luggage scanners twice. Could this have made it dull?

If anyone has any ideas please let me know.

Thank you in advance.


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#2 Gabe Agoado

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Posted 13 July 2015 - 01:58 PM

Hi, I have shot with an 814 before. To be honest your results look fairly decent. You can look up videos on youtube of others who have shot with the same setup and what you have will compare nicely. HOWEVER:

 

If you use an external light meter and set the exposure manually as opposed to automatic, you might get better results. The 814 was originally designed for the now out of print kodachrome stocks, the closest of which, to the Vision Three 50D, would be the Kodachrome 40. This discrepancy might be the reason for the "dullness" as the automatic exposure of the camera is probably under-exposing by 1/3 of a stop because it expects a slightly faster film.


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#3 Mark Dunn

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Posted 13 July 2015 - 02:27 PM

No, that would be over-exposure, not under. The camera is expecting a slower film. Anyway 1/3 stop is insignificant.

The look of scanned neg on a monitor is very different from projected reversal which may be what you are remembering.


Edited by Mark Dunn, 13 July 2015 - 02:28 PM.

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#4 Gabe Agoado

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Posted 13 July 2015 - 02:44 PM

My mistake, thanks for the correction. I think what Mark is saying is accurate.
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#5 Carl Looper

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Posted 13 July 2015 - 03:07 PM

Vision stocks have a lot more lattitude than previous filmstocks, so there's a lot more dynamic range information being packed into the image. The result of this is that a transfer can come out looking low contrast or "dull". That which you would expect to be brighter (such as the sky) can look less so. And equally shadows not as dark as you might prefer. But this is exactly what you want. It means the image can be adjusted.

 

What you want to do is adjust the highlights up and the shadows down according to whatever particular look you are after. Which is what you've done and precisely what a low contrast telecine allows you to do.

 

C


Edited by Carl Looper, 13 July 2015 - 03:13 PM.

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#6 HarleyD Hill-Richmond

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Posted 13 July 2015 - 04:06 PM

Oh okay, so maybe it's for the best then. I'll keep on playing with the contrast settings and try to get it as good as I can.

Would you say that my cameras internal meter is doing the job alright? That it's just the latitude of the film stock.

Thanks very much for your help


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#7 Carl Looper

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Posted 13 July 2015 - 06:09 PM

Oh okay, so maybe it's for the best then. I'll keep on playing with the contrast settings and try to get it as good as I can.

Would you say that my cameras internal meter is doing the job alright? That it's just the latitude of the film stock.

Thanks very much for your help

 

The exposure is fine. A bad exposure would have either shadows that are too dark, or highlights that are too light, neither of which are demonstrated in the result. But its difficult to say if the meter is operating at it's optimum because the filmstock is so forgiving. You could be a quite a few stops out yet still get a good result.

 

C


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#8 Anthony Schilling

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Posted 13 July 2015 - 08:47 PM

Negative film is designed to be graded as to how you want it to look .A raw inverted scan is very flat, but full of information to be manipulated. The same would be true for a RAW digital image. You have a lot of room to tweak the levels and contrast to your liking. Reversal on the other hand comes out as is, rich contrast and colors that cannot be manipulated much at all.


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#9 Jose luis villar

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Posted 14 July 2015 - 06:57 AM

Hi Harley,

 

Look at,

 

Anthony is right, negative film is designed to be rated.


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#10 Will Montgomery

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Posted 14 July 2015 - 08:41 AM

Film transfer is all about the colorist; the guy who takes the scan and makes the color what you want. Next time tell the transfer house that you want to boost up the color and contrast.

 

Another thing to think about is limiting your pans. With super 8 long pans across a landscape are hard to watch sometimes...you may be better off just stoping, re-framing and start shooting again or at least do very slow pans.


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#11 HarleyD Hill-Richmond

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Posted 14 July 2015 - 10:06 AM

Thanks for the information.

 

Will, you're definitely right about the pans, it was my first time in Japan and I was desperate to try and capture as much as possible, haha... I know, it's a weird way to think.


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