Jump to content


Photo

Day for night lighting in B&W (tips)

Day For Night

  • Please log in to reply
4 replies to this topic

#1 Jean Paul DiSciscio

Jean Paul DiSciscio
  • Basic Members
  • PipPip
  • 17 posts
  • Cinematographer

Posted 27 July 2015 - 05:43 PM

I have an upcoming production for which I am exploring day for night shooting. The film will be shot in black and white primarily on a Sony F5. Any tips/tricks that can be offered on day for night shooting, lighting needs, camera functions and post-production processes would be appreciated! We only have the location during the afternoon, but the overall aesthetic of the film references early Hollywood so the day for night shooting is appropriate. 

 

Best,

 

JP


  • 0

#2 Michael LaVoie

Michael LaVoie
  • Basic Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 714 posts
  • Cinematographer

Posted 27 July 2015 - 05:57 PM

Day for night works best midday when the sun is directly overhead and mostly on a clear day.   The effect is moonlight which is direct or near direct toplight usually.  Not very sidey except when it's coming through windows mostly. Since you're doing black and white, you're only key to people of the time and day is the contrast ratios and the elements in the frame like practical lights.  You can't play with color contrast the way most films would.

 

If it's overcast and you have a very softlit look, that's rough.  It should look more hard.  And if the sun starts setting and becomes a bright low angle key it'll probably look odd cause moonlight doesn't look like that.  

 

But I don't know your locations or any details.  Those are just general tips. The trouble is day for night when there's no color contrast and no practicals.  That's always the dead giveaway.  You're shooting black and white so that will help.  However there is still the issue of practical lights.

 

For example, if you shoot in a city and the streetlights aren't on and the cars aren't using headlights and what not, the audience might think it's weird looking.  But if you're in the country it's less of an issue.  I would still keep it in mind and try to make it look like people have turned on lights because it's dark out.


  • 0

#3 Brian Drysdale

Brian Drysdale
  • Basic Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 5032 posts
  • Cinematographer

Posted 28 July 2015 - 02:47 AM

They used a red filter for day for night when shooting black & white film because it darkened the blue sky. Perhaps it's something that could be done in post with a digital camera.


  • 0

#4 aapo lettinen

aapo lettinen
  • Basic Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 964 posts
  • Other
  • Finland

Posted 28 July 2015 - 05:29 AM

They used a red filter for day for night when shooting black & white film because it darkened the blue sky. Perhaps it's something that could be done in post with a digital camera.

yeah it can be done in post if the colour channels are not clipping and you are shooting colour and adding the b/w effect in post. a pola can also help a lot


  • 0

#5 Jean Paul DiSciscio

Jean Paul DiSciscio
  • Basic Members
  • PipPip
  • 17 posts
  • Cinematographer

Posted 28 July 2015 - 12:51 PM

Great. Thanks for the helpful hints.


  • 0


CineLab

FJS International, LLC

Visual Products

Tai Audio

Aerial Filmworks

Gamma Ray Digital Inc

Media Blackout - Custom Cables and AKS

The Slider

Paralinx LLC

Abel Cine

rebotnix Technologies

Ritter Battery

Metropolis Post

Technodolly

Glidecam

Rig Wheels Passport

Wooden Camera

Willys Widgets

Broadcast Solutions Inc

CineTape

Aerial Filmworks

FJS International, LLC

Media Blackout - Custom Cables and AKS

Technodolly

Abel Cine

CineLab

Broadcast Solutions Inc

Metropolis Post

rebotnix Technologies

Gamma Ray Digital Inc

Ritter Battery

The Slider

CineTape

Tai Audio

Willys Widgets

Glidecam

Wooden Camera

Rig Wheels Passport

Paralinx LLC

Visual Products