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#1 micheallLeake

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Posted 30 July 2015 - 08:53 AM

I am new to cinematography.com and I have been reading about splicing film.

My needs are this; I am filming on Kodak Tri-X B&W reversal 16mm stock. I want to edit this for my own viewing on my 16mm film projector.  What would be the best brand of splicer and the best type of splicing technique(tape, cement, hot splicing???) I think the film I am using is polyester based, but I do not really know.

Thanks for the help, anyone.

Mike L


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#2 aapo lettinen

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Posted 30 July 2015 - 09:04 AM

the Tri-X is acetate base film.  tape splicing is easiest to do and you can open/change/repair the splices easily if you want. they usually show very clearly in projector so for final product other techniques would be better


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#3 Perry Paolantonio

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Posted 30 July 2015 - 01:19 PM

I personally prefer Rivas-style splicers, and that's what we use here for any splicing of 16mm. The tape is pre-perforated so it takes a little practice to get the technique down, but the splicers are solid and easily available on ebay. They look like this: http://www.ebay.com/...=item35eb5f00ba

 

Note there are two there - one splices straight and the other diagonally. You don't want the diagonal splicer, that's for 16mm fullcoat audio tape. You want the straight type. Also, these are in rough shape, but these splicers are super easy to take apart with just a screwdriver or two, and all the parts can be easily cleaned and lubricated, so they're simple to maintain.

 

Lots of people like the Ciro guillotine splicers, and they're fine for new film, but they're much more expensive. The advantage is that they don't use pre-perfed tape, and they're less tricky to use. 

 

I prefer tape, because you can undo the splice if you need to and it's less destructive than cement splices. 

 

-perry


Edited by Perry Paolantonio, 30 July 2015 - 01:24 PM.

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#4 David Cunningham

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Posted 30 July 2015 - 04:20 PM

Ditto perry
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#5 Tyler Purcell

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Posted 30 July 2015 - 05:03 PM

Ciro guillotine splicers are what I use for work prints. You can get them cheap on ebay, I picked up 3 of them for $100 bux few years ago to cut a short film. For finalization, I like to use a heat splicer, they work great for longevity.
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#6 micheallLeake

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Posted 31 July 2015 - 03:25 PM

Everyone whose has given advice, thanks it has been very helpful.

M.L.


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