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Vision3 500t super 8 camera metering/notch hack?

super 8 500t

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#1 Hunter O'Shea

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Posted 06 August 2015 - 05:11 PM

Hey guys. Please excuse the amateur question but I have a few rolls of vision 3 500t I'm really looking forward to shooting, however I only own two super 8 cameras and I'm not sure how either one of the models will meter for the film speed. One camera being a Sankyo XL-40S and the other being a Bell and Howell T 20 Xl. The super 8 database lists the film speed recognitions as auto for 25/40 and 100/160 ASA (daylight/tungsten). I've only run 50d, 100d, and plus-x through this camera all of which I was able to expose accurately.

I guess my question is if anyone has experience with these cameras in particular or shooting 500t in similar circumstances? I'd hate to buy a new camera just so I can use the film. I successfully shot 500t once on a canon 310xl by notch hacking the cartridge. I no longer have the camera but maybe that could be a possible solution to shooting with these cameras.

Any help would be appreciated.

Thanks!

 

-Hunter


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#2 Zac Fettig

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Posted 06 August 2015 - 06:25 PM

The cameras will meter it as 160 Tungsten film. It'll over expose by 1 and 2/3 stops. Given the latitude of the film, it'll be fine.

 

You won't need to notch hack the film. I doubt it did anything on the 310xl. I doubt it would do anything here. The 310xl probably metered the 500T film at 250T (the upper limit for the camera).

 

If you're buying film, you'd be better served with 200T most of the time though.


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#3 Hunter O'Shea

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Posted 06 August 2015 - 08:20 PM

Thank you Zac! Given that the film with be over exposed by 1 and 2/3 stops would it be safe to take a light reading and stop it down that amount on the sankyo being its a manual exposure camera?

Side note: I plan on using the film to shoot in a low light.

Thanks.

 

-Hunter


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#4 David Cunningham

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Posted 06 August 2015 - 09:09 PM

An external light meter is the best for sure. But remember to take into account the 2/3 stop light loss for the prism in the viewfinder.
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#5 Zac Fettig

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Posted 07 August 2015 - 06:25 AM

If it was me shooting, with those cameras, I'd just leave it on auto, and overexpose.

 

David is right though. An external meter is almost always the best choice. But check the manuals to see if they've calibrated the settings to compensate for the prism.


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#6 Anthony Schilling

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Posted 07 August 2015 - 01:26 PM

When it comes to 500T, I would just stick to using it where other stocks (200T/TriX) are too slow to get a decent enough exposure or reading. If your meter isn't moving the needle at the rated 160ASA, the extra 1&2/3rds you're actually getting out if the stock most likely won't lead to an over exposure. I assume you can't manually adjust or lock the exposure on those cameras?


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#7 Chris Burke

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Posted 09 August 2015 - 06:15 AM

I use the 500t in my Sankyo XL-255 outdoors often. On an overcast day, I leave it on auto often enough. As said before, it meters the film has 160 tungsten. That's one stop over if you're using an 85 filter. Disengage the filter the internal filter that is. And use an external one. the one stop over is exactly where you want to be with that film and super 8. I get great results in full auto exposure in my Sankyo super 8 camera much the same as yours.they both have a 220 degrees shutter.that particular film stock is extremely forgiving especially in color range. For window light use interior heavy window light use, there is no better stock.
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#8 Hunter O'Shea

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Posted 09 August 2015 - 01:57 PM

Anthony, I can manually adjust and lock the exposure on the sankyo camera.

 

Chris, the film will only be used at night but possibly with a fish a fish eye and camera light as I'm planning on shooting skateboarding at a park with overhead lighting. Im afraid of areas being blown out especially with the hard light.

 

So should I leave the camera on auto or stop it down the 1 2/3 that the camera will overexpose by?

Thanks!

 

-Hunter


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#9 Josh Gladstone

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Posted 09 August 2015 - 04:25 PM

You don't have an incident light meter, do you? That would be the best way to know where to set your exposure.


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#10 Hunter O'Shea

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Posted 09 August 2015 - 04:46 PM

I don't... I've always relied on the internal meter which I'm sure is insane to a most people on this board haha.

 

- Hunter


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#11 Josh Gladstone

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Posted 09 August 2015 - 06:32 PM

They can be a bit cost prohibitive. I was working on a super low-cost DIY Arduino-based light meter, but I got sidetracked with a Polaroid hacking project, but once I finish that or get some time off work, I'll try to finish up the light meter project. Might be up your alley.

 


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#12 Hunter O'Shea

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Posted 09 August 2015 - 06:49 PM

Josh...

You are doing some very impressive work of great importance. I would be very interested in a lower cost option such as this. Keep up the good work!

 

- Hunter


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#13 Anthony Schilling

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Posted 09 August 2015 - 07:16 PM

Anthony, I can manually adjust and lock the exposure on the sankyo camera.

 

Chris, the film will only be used at night but possibly with a fish a fish eye and camera light as I'm planning on shooting skateboarding at a park with overhead lighting. Im afraid of areas being blown out especially with the hard light.

 

So should I leave the camera on auto or stop it down the 1 2/3 that the camera will overexpose by?

Thanks!

 

-Hunter

I would take a good reading of your subject matter on the ground, then close down just 1 stop from there and leave it locked because you don't want any exposure pulsing. You will still be over exposing by 2/3rds, but that will just add a little more density and pop as well as tighten the grain a little. If your shot wanders into the overhead lights, it will only look cool. Nothing else can handle bright light flashing like 500T.

 

I've always had good results using my internal meters because they factor in exactly how much light the beam splitter is taking away. The problem with external meters is that they don't compensate for the beam splitter, which varies from one model to the next between maybe 1/3rd to over 1 stop?. I have yet to find or hear an exact amount of light loss from any splitter, and no one really seems to know for sure on any one model. 


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#14 Hunter O'Shea

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Posted 09 August 2015 - 08:57 PM

Thank you Anthony. I will try that. That sounds like a good solution considering all the factors. I will be using a frezzi on camera light for some fisheye shots and that thing can be very bright on some spots but I feel like locking it one stop under what the meter reads should work out well.

Thanks again for your time my friend!

 

- Hunter


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