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Light Meters


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#1 Paul Tackett

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Posted 18 August 2015 - 10:57 AM

Looking for a good light meter. I know Sekonic is pretty solid.

 

What type of meter is this one? Any clue?

 

MI5-08643R_300X0.jpg

 

Looking for a good spot and incident meter if anyone has suggestions.

 

Thanks


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#2 David Mullen ASC

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Posted 18 August 2015 - 11:12 AM

Looks like he is holding a Sekonic L-308S:

http://www.sekonic.c...s/overview.aspx

 

You want a combo incident and spot meter?


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#3 Jay Young

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Posted 18 August 2015 - 11:40 AM

Sekonic 758 has both.

So does the Gossen Starlite

 

Do you actually need a spot meter?

I don't know that I've seen anyone use a spot meter for cinematography. 

Could be useful tho.


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#4 John E Clark

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Posted 18 August 2015 - 12:06 PM

The Sekonic 758 cine seems to be the industry work horse for meters these days. It has both incident and spot capability, and from looking a the various BTS, both modes seem to be used by 'someone'... Since most BTSs have 'action' shots, rather than the dull setting up shots... I've seen DP's using the incident mode more frequently.

 

But in general, the spot meter allows one to see the various lighting on specific scene elements, such as faces, check ratios of lighting on faces more accurately than using the incident mode (or the 30 deg reflective mode ).

 

For my own use, I have a Minolta Spot and a Sekonic L-308 for incident measurements.

 

For stills I used the spot meter exclusively for about 35 years. As digital Film improved and I moved in to making moving pictures, I've used the incident more frequently for checking if there is enough light in general for the shot, and use the spot meter for 'shaping' light, or checking to see if when the talent moves, lighting doesn't 'change' unless intended.

 

Since I don't have the equipment to monitor what is being shot, beyond the simplistic 'electronic view' finder displays, that is no 'scopes', I have to make sure the ratios are what I want by using the spotmeter. With a scope display one can see the levels of the scene elements, or with the 'false color' modes, see various levels represented in a different way to insure that the shot is lit to the desired arrangement.


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#5 Paul Tackett

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Posted 18 August 2015 - 12:06 PM

Yeah, I like both types of readings and don't want to carry around 2 meters.


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#6 Gregg MacPherson

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Posted 18 August 2015 - 08:08 PM

Nothing wrong with having two meters on your belt. What's the second one been replaced with? Oh, a cell phone ! (big laugh)
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