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Will I Gain Much - DPX vs TIFF?


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#1 Julian Fletcher

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Posted 22 August 2015 - 03:23 PM

Hi,

 

I am having Vision 3 50D Super 16 scanned at 2k and will get the file as an image sequence. I am using a PC with Sony Vegas Movie Studio (yes, not ideal but all that funds are allowing currently - NB this is Sony Vegas light version not the full one).

 

Despite having latest Quicktime PRO installed, Vegas cannot read Pro Res files, so the only option is an image sequence.

 

My options are:

 

1) Get a Pro Res 422HQ or 4444 from the lab, and use Quicktime to make the TIFF images for Vegas to see as an image sequence.

2) Get TIFF files from the lab.

3) Get DPX files from the lab, but I'll need to update to Vegas PRO for that (upgrade cost 300 dollars).

 

Bearing in mind that the final output is Blu Ray for home viewing in HD, and never cinema distribution - what's my best bet?

 

My goal is obviously resolution and sharpness of the images. Clearly unless I completely switch software, I am stuck with image sequences - the question is how best to acquire them.

 

Apart from usability on future projects, will I gain much in picture quality with the DPX files vs the TIFF ones? Is it worth the extra outlay in the software needed? (NB - I think storage wise I am ok). Should I just stick with 422 and let Quicktime make the TIFF files?

 

Your thoughts would be much appreciated,

Best Regards

Julian


Edited by Julian Fletcher, 22 August 2015 - 03:36 PM.

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#2 Phil Thompson

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Posted 22 August 2015 - 03:37 PM

Dpx
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#3 Phil Thompson

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Posted 22 August 2015 - 03:38 PM

Dpx is loads better than 422 pro res! By a mile. Don't skimp. You want those sexy 12meg a frame dpx files
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#4 Tyler Purcell

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Posted 22 August 2015 - 08:44 PM

Yep DPX for sure.

However, DaVinci is free and has a great editor built in which reads everything. So maybe an option vs Sony Vegas?

One side note, DPX is 10 bit and Pro Res 4444 is 12 bit.
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#5 Dirk DeJonghe

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Posted 22 August 2015 - 11:25 PM

DPX is 10 bit and then best use in LOG encoding, if you use linear encoding use 16bit DPX.

DPX can be 8, 10 or 16 bit. 


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#6 Freya Black

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Posted 23 August 2015 - 04:10 AM

What about Tiff vs DPX? Tiff is normally lossless and can do 12 and 16 bit I think?

Does DPX have some other advantage over Tiffs?

 

Freya


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#7 Freya Black

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Posted 23 August 2015 - 04:18 AM

On the face of it it seems like you could get DPX from the lab and do a batch convert to Tiff yourself.

You could use the free ImageMagick program perhaps.

 

You probably want to test this workflow first tho.

 

Freya


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#8 Dirk DeJonghe

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Posted 23 August 2015 - 07:07 AM

There is no reason to convert DPX to TIFF unless your software can't handle it. DPX is by far the most preferred format for professional exchange. At this very moment I am doing a commercial for a very famous beer, downloaded from London, and my work will go to LA for final finish. DPX in/out.

DPX can be 8, 10, 12?,16 bits with or without alpha channel and can have embedded soundtrack as well. I can capture realtime DPX with 16 soundtracks embedded.

In my operation, say the customer wants to change a few seconds in a 90 minute feature. In DPX operations, you rerender the sequence of a couple hundred frames. In Quicktime you have to rerender the whole 90 minutes.

It all depends on your available hard- and software capabilities


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#9 Julian Fletcher

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Posted 25 August 2015 - 12:22 PM

many thanks for the replies - I am going for 10 bit log dpx.


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#10 Freya Black

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Posted 26 August 2015 - 09:05 AM

There is no reason to convert DPX to TIFF unless your software can't handle it.

 

Which is the situation we were discussing as the O.P. has a version of Vegas that cant handle DPX but can work with Tiff! :)


Edited by Freya Black, 26 August 2015 - 09:06 AM.

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#11 Julian Fletcher

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Posted 26 August 2015 - 12:08 PM

I'm either going to upgrade the software to Vegas Pro, or try the free download of Davinci Resolve as apparently that can read DPX.

The scanning company are also going to provide 4444HQ which I can open via Quicktime PRO and if need be make TIFFs from that, but DPX will be my priority format.


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