Jump to content


Photo

Proper cable technique


  • Please log in to reply
3 replies to this topic

#1 Lance Soltys

Lance Soltys
  • Basic Members
  • PipPip
  • 64 posts
  • Other
  • Chicago, IL

Posted 23 August 2015 - 05:17 PM

A while back, there was a discussion about how to coil cable. Mr. Hartman pointed out that the over-under technique was for coaxial cable but not the proper way for power cables. So now I've been thinking I've been doing power cables all wrong. (Really, do I just wrap it around my arm?) Would anyone like to chime in on the "proper" way to work with the different types of cable? XLR cable (over-under in my experience), power cables, etc.
  • 0


#2 JD Hartman

JD Hartman
  • Basic Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 1690 posts
  • Gaffer
  • Edison, N.J. U.S.A.

Posted 23 August 2015 - 05:46 PM

Definitely not around your arm unless it's an orange (or green, yellow, etc.) extension cord.  To the best of my recollection, the technique is called over-over?  The theory is to coil the power cord so you aren't fighting the natural layup of conductors and filler strands under the outer jacket.  As constructed, multi-conductor power cable has an internal twist to it, don't recall if it's left hand or right hand.  A sure sign that you doing it wrong or that the stinger has been coiled incorrectly many times is that it will resist being neatly coiled and one or more loops will twist back on themselves. 

 

For what it's worth, here some views from the theater and touring show world: http://www.controlbo...-coiling.23319/

 

Figure 8 if you want to have a stinger energized and ready to be payed-out and lay flat without any twist to it.

 

...and Lance, just JD works fine for me.


Edited by JD Hartman, 23 August 2015 - 05:47 PM.

  • 0

#3 Michael Collier

Michael Collier
  • Basic Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 1262 posts
  • Gaffer
  • Los Angeles, CA

Posted 23 August 2015 - 11:03 PM

All power is always over-over, clockwise.  Usually for consistency I hold the female end in my left hand, with the hubble pointing backward.  On each coil, you should be putting a very slight roll in the cable so it lays flat.  When you get good, you should be able to tie the wraps, then connect the hubbles without on loop being any bigger or smaller than the others.  The coil size should fit into a milk crate perfectly. I've never figure-8 a stinger, although I suppose you could. Its mandatory for 220 bates or 110 bates under load, as well as head feeders for big lights.


  • 0

#4 Phil Rhodes

Phil Rhodes
  • Sustaining Members
  • 11874 posts
  • Other

Posted 24 August 2015 - 02:48 AM

Yaack, never, ever over your arm, for anything - it'll never coil easily nor lay flat ever again.

 

There's essentially two ways of doing it. Various people will tell you that either approach is the One True Way. The difference fundamentally is whether you want to be able to lay the coil on the floor and pull on the free end, or whether you want to carry the coil along, paying out cable as you go. Since the difference is often very situationally-specific, I've always been cautious about accepting either approach as the One True.

 

P


  • 0


Gamma Ray Digital Inc

Ritter Battery

Broadcast Solutions Inc

Willys Widgets

FJS International, LLC

The Slider

CineTape

CineLab

Visual Products

Glidecam

rebotnix Technologies

Rig Wheels Passport

Media Blackout - Custom Cables and AKS

Technodolly

Aerial Filmworks

Paralinx LLC

Metropolis Post

Tai Audio

Wooden Camera

Abel Cine

Abel Cine

Media Blackout - Custom Cables and AKS

rebotnix Technologies

Ritter Battery

Technodolly

FJS International, LLC

Metropolis Post

Aerial Filmworks

CineLab

Tai Audio

Willys Widgets

Rig Wheels Passport

Visual Products

The Slider

CineTape

Broadcast Solutions Inc

Wooden Camera

Paralinx LLC

Glidecam

Gamma Ray Digital Inc