Jump to content




Photo

Most compact + easy-to-setup stabiliser for Canon 6d with 24-70 ii?


  • Please log in to reply
3 replies to this topic

#1 Dylan Smith

Dylan Smith

    New

  • Basic Members
  • Pip
  • 2 posts
  • Other

Posted 08 September 2015 - 08:09 AM

Hi guys,

 

I am currently using my Canon 6D with either the 24-70 f2.8 ii OR the 16-35 f4L IS to do my filming. However, I find myself using more of the former as it is a lot more versatile (in terms of getting wide and detail shots). Got a couple of questions regarding stabilisation here:

 

  1.        What is the most compact + easy-to-setup stabiliser that I can use with my 24-70 cam? It has to fit into my Kata 3N-20 bag for shooting vacation videos (personal, not paid work).
  2.        Would the result of the choice above be better than using my 16-35 f4L IS in terms of stabilisation?
  3.        Alternatively, if I were to get the Tamron 24-70 VC, how is the VC compared to Canon’s 16-35 f4L IS? Also, will I be seeing a visible drop in video quality – comparing the Canon 24-70ii to the Tamron? I find it hard to get samples online, as those on YouTube/Vimeo are terribly compressed and don’t look as good as it should.
  4.        Are there YouTube videos that teach me how to improve my stride when doing tracking shots (either side to side or front to back)?

  • 0




#2 Tyler Purcell

Tyler Purcell
  • Sustaining Members
  • 2368 posts
  • Other
  • Los Angeles

Posted 09 September 2015 - 03:28 AM

I use a monopod that hooks right to the side of my little backpack. Plus, I use a magnetic viewfinder adaptor which magnifies the LCD display and allows you to press the camera against your face.

These two things in conjunction with one another, create unbelievably stable shots, only out done by a tripod.

Moving with the camera, I push it against my face and take my right arm and hold the top of the monopod. This removes any stabilization problems between your body and the camera. Then all you've gotta be is super ninja and figure out how to make your body walk smoothly, which can take some time. I use to operate stedicam's, so I learned how to walk like a cat. When I'm not traveling, I have a shoulder mount kit, which solves all the problems for not much money.

The video side of the still cameras is SUBSTANTIALLY lower quality then the still side. So if you're looking for samples of lens quality, it's far better to look at still images, rather then video's on youtube. The camera only shoots 8 bit 4:2:0 MPEG @ 50Mbps, which is pretty much exactly what is presented on youtube, only @ 5Mbps instead. However the still's can be 14 bit RAW, which is isn't even comparable to the video side.

Still glass is not designed for video work. The moment you touch the manual focus ring, you will find it will always pop out of focus, even if you didn't make any marketable changes. This is because the ring doesn't turn much at all. There isn't very much fine-tuning ability with manual focus and auto focus doesn't work great with video mode. So MOST people opt for lenses suitable for video, which are either very old and all mechanical or modern and expensive.
  • 0

#3 Dylan Smith

Dylan Smith

    New

  • Basic Members
  • Pip
  • 2 posts
  • Other

Posted 09 September 2015 - 08:46 AM

Hey there,

 

Thanks for the reply. 

 

I also did try using a monopod to make steadicam-like moves. The hardest part is trying to track someone moving towards you (while you're moving back at the same time). it's quite limiting to use the viewfinder adaptor (e.g. Zacuto) cos it would usually have to be at eye level, otherwise the stabilisation will suffer (e.g. trying to do duck walks at low angle).

 

Yup, noted on the lack of data recorded to file. On a side note, I was wondering why modern mobile cameras (e.g. Samsung S6) can produce way sharper videos (be it 4k downscaled to 1080p, or native 1080p) and beat my 6D (which looks terribly crummy). the only downside is that I can't change the focal length/aperture etc. 


  • 0

#4 Tyler Purcell

Tyler Purcell
  • Sustaining Members
  • 2368 posts
  • Other
  • Los Angeles

Posted 09 September 2015 - 11:59 AM

Yea, the monopod and viewfinder adaptor are really the only two tricks that work. So if you struggle to make them work, there really isn't anything else that's anywhere near that small for traveling. Even my gigantic should rig, is hard to backup. Side to side isn't bad, forward isn't bad, but backing up is always a problem. This is why everyone uses spotters when backing up, someone who can grab hold of your belt on your pants and help guide you through the backup process. When I've shot with stedicam's before, I usually turn the whole rig around and walk forward, when doing backup shots. I find they look MUCH more stable, even if you don't have a clean look at the monitor.

Your 6D should blow the doors off any mobile phone camera. I've found the DSLR's like to do things for you, so perhaps it's auto adjusting the ASA/ISO on you, which his why it looks soft. The Canon DSLR's really like certain ASA/ISO's, so I'd do a google search and see which one's it likes. Also, that focus issue those lenses have is pervasive, it can really make things look soft. I've never been able to find a solution around it besides buying all new manual glass. So I stopped using DSLR's and changed to...

If you want more quality in a much smaller, lighter package which is designed specifically for cinema grade images, you should checkout the Blackmagic Pocket camera. Shoots 12 bit raw and 10 bit 4:2:2 pro res.


  • 0


Rig Wheels Passport

Zylight

The Slider

Visual Products

Tai Audio

rebotnix Technologies

Glidecam

Abel Cine

Paralinx LLC

Aerial Filmworks

Pro 8mm

CineLab

Broadcast Solutions Inc

Ritter Battery

CineTape

Technodolly

Willys Widgets

The Slider

Paralinx LLC

CineLab

Glidecam

Abel Cine

Broadcast Solutions Inc

Technodolly

Willys Widgets

Ritter Battery

Visual Products

Zylight

CineTape

Rig Wheels Passport

Tai Audio

rebotnix Technologies

Aerial Filmworks

Pro 8mm