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Want some old magazines?


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#1 David Mullen ASC

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Posted 21 September 2015 - 08:35 PM

I have a couple of boxes of old ICG Magazines going back through the 1990's, semi-complete.

 

And boxes of Cinefex magazines -- not complete, I'm keeping the (good) pre-CGI era issues and any historical vfx issues... and Star Trek movie issues.

 

I've just run out of storage space.  Too many American Cinematographers...

 

Anyway, anyone in Los Angeles who wants these (I'm not shipping them, we can just meet somewhere) can have them for free. I'm not a collector, I'm a reader... so these are well-worn, well-read, and incomplete.  Just want them to go to someone who likes to read about cinematography as much as I do.

 

Send me a PM in response.


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#2 Thea Valgardsson

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Posted 22 September 2015 - 08:50 AM

So wishing I lived in LA just for this. Lucky guy who gets them. 


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#3 Bill DiPietra

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Posted 22 September 2015 - 03:02 PM

So wishing I lived in LA just for this. Lucky guy who gets them. 

 

Ditto!  By the way, welcome to the forum, Thea. :)


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#4 Alex Nelson

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Posted 22 September 2015 - 03:05 PM

Hi David,

 

I'd be interested in them, if you're still offering. I recently came across some AC issues of a similar vintage in a thrift store and they're an incredible reference for the equipment and techniques of the time.


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#5 David Mullen ASC

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Posted 22 September 2015 - 04:18 PM

Someone has already contacted me for them...

 

It was a bit sad going through my Cinefex collection, I kept Issue #1 to #103 or so, about to 2004.  But I'm giving the rest away.  What's sad is that I was so passionate about visual effects because I used to be a model builder and painter, but now that it is all done in computers, it's hard not to yawn when reading the new articles.  No matter what the subject is, the technique is the same now.


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#6 Bill DiPietra

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Posted 22 September 2015 - 04:44 PM

Someone has already contacted me for them...

 

It was a bit sad going through my Cinefex collection, I kept Issue #1 to #103 or so, about to 2004.  But I'm giving the rest away.  What's sad is that I was so passionate about visual effects because I used to be a model builder and painter, but now that it is all done in computers, it's hard not to yawn when reading the new articles.  No matter what the subject is, the technique is the same now.

 

Ironically, as I read this I have the December, '85 issue of American Cinematographer in my hands and it's all about visual effects.  I was just reading the article on Enemy Mine and all the matte paintings they did for that film.  They mention how the landscapes resembled  Chesley Bonestell paintings - someone I'd never heard of until I looked him up just now.  I was amazed at how some of his paintings look like film grabs from 2001: A Space Odyssey.

 

You learn so much from these older articles.


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#7 Thea Valgardsson

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Posted 22 September 2015 - 04:55 PM

 

Ditto!  By the way, welcome to the forum, Thea. :)

Thank you, Bill! I'm excited to be here.

I literally just bought my first subscription for American Cinematographers print today. Began diving into the digital archives.. It's a serious goldmine. 


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#8 David Mullen ASC

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Posted 22 September 2015 - 08:53 PM

 

They mention how the landscapes resembled  Chesley Bonestell paintings - someone I'd never heard of until I looked him up just now.  I was amazed at how some of his paintings look like film grabs from 2001: A Space Odyssey.

 

You're young... Chesley Bonestell was THE space art painter of the 50's and 60's, you see his influence in all of those George Pal movies like "When Worlds Collide" and "Destination Moon".  Robert McCall came later in the 60's and did the promotional art for "2001", including the main poster.  He has a huge mural in the Smithsonian Air & Space Museum.

 

One of my earliest film memories was watching the original "Godzilla" on TV in the 3rd grade (1971?) -- those Japanese monster movies, with all of that model work, were a big influence alongside "Star Trek" reruns.


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#9 John E Clark

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Posted 23 September 2015 - 01:58 PM

 

 

One of my earliest film memories was watching the original "Godzilla" on TV in the 3rd grade (1971?) -- those Japanese monster movies, will all of that model work, were a big influence alongside "Star Trek" reruns.

 

My viewing of such fare was via a local to San Diego show hosted by a character named "Moonalisa"... pictured below with some guy... at some point I decided that I was watching these movies mainly because of her appeal to my adolescent inclinations...

 

In terms of 'willing suspension of disbelief'... every time a rocket had a smoke plume that moved 'up'... I lost my belief... I didn't mind sound effects in space as much as those 'wrong' smoke plumes...

 

 

937c55d55813db7f4b8c3a8c9e036738.jpg


Edited by John E Clark, 23 September 2015 - 01:59 PM.

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#10 David Mullen ASC

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Posted 23 September 2015 - 02:28 PM

I believe that guy was Forrest J. Ackerman:

https://en.wikipedia...rest_J_Ackerman

 

I was lucky enough to take a tour of his house before he passed away; he had an amazing collection of science fiction memorabilia.  There was talk of creating a science fiction museum in his house or elsewhere after his death, but instead it was all auctioned off.


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#11 John E Clark

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Posted 23 September 2015 - 04:33 PM

I believe that guy was Forrest J. Ackerman:

https://en.wikipedia...rest_J_Ackerman

 

I was lucky enough to take a tour of his house before he passed away; he had an amazing collection of science fiction memorabilia.  There was talk of creating a science fiction museum in his house or elsewhere after his death, but instead it was all auctioned off.

 

Thanks for the info. I've not been one to remember these sorts of things. I enjoy sci-fi and that genre fills quite a bit of our film library, but other than reading some set of the 'original' novels that some sci-fi films have been adapted from, I've not gotten into the who's who.


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#12 Carl Looper

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Posted 25 September 2015 - 11:10 PM

Someone has already contacted me for them...

 

It was a bit sad going through my Cinefex collection, I kept Issue #1 to #103 or so, about to 2004.  But I'm giving the rest away.  What's sad is that I was so passionate about visual effects because I used to be a model builder and painter, but now that it is all done in computers, it's hard not to yawn when reading the new articles.  No matter what the subject is, the technique is the same now.

 

Although I work in digital effects I find traditional practical effects (models, matte paintings etc) just so much more interesting and compelling - not just in the way they are done (which is compelling in it's own right) but also in the result. But it's really hard to put one's finger on it, or find the right words to characterise it ... because it's not in how convincing or unconvincing they are ... but something else. I think it's just the nature of the photographic image - whether collaged or not - that it differs at some fundamental level from the digitally generated. There's a certain tension that remains between how a practical effect is done and the result, whether intended or otherwise. Some sort of reciprical exchange going on between the how and the what, with each supporting the other.

 

I've been working towards some traditional effects of late - to be done on film - but not entirely without some digital voodoo - just a different way of doing the digital side - or perhaps an old way - where the computer works more behind the scene rather than in creating the scene. As I understand it, in the original Star Wars film, there was some simple digital motion control of the cameras. In any case: that sort of thing. There's a movement in computing called "physical computing" which has been around for ages, but finds contemporary expression in things like 3D printers, where the computer is controlling something in the physical world. Robots are another example. Real ones (true lies?) as distinct from some computer animator's vision of such.

 

I like to make a distinction between the graphic and the photographic, where I treat the graphic as a subset of the photographic, rather than the other way around. The graphic artist, of course, will argue it the other way. Or perhaps just maintaining a tension between the two - keeping such visible rather than perfecting it's erasure.

 

And putting that on the screen.

 

C


Edited by Carl Looper, 25 September 2015 - 11:19 PM.

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#13 Mark Dunn

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Posted 26 September 2015 - 05:13 AM

Robert Heinlein used 'bonestell' as a verb.


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#14 Satsuki Murashige

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Posted 26 September 2015 - 05:33 PM

I believe that guy was Forrest J. Ackerman:
https://en.wikipedia...rest_J_Ackerman
 
I was lucky enough to take a tour of his house before he passed away; he had an amazing collection of science fiction memorabilia.  There was talk of creating a science fiction museum in his house or elsewhere after his death, but instead it was all auctioned off.

The Ackermonster! Stephen King was also a big fan apparently.
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