Jump to content


Photo

Can you run Fcp 7 on updated macs


  • Please log in to reply
12 replies to this topic

#1 Cristian Carceller

Cristian Carceller
  • Basic Members
  • PipPip
  • 44 posts
  • Cinematographer
  • Los Angeles, California

Posted 23 September 2015 - 10:36 PM

Someone told me that you cannot run fcp7 on new macs. is this true? Im a much better editor on fcp7 and its hard for me to change. If there is any way of doing this. Let me know!

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Cristan


  • 0


#2 Stuart Brereton

Stuart Brereton
  • Basic Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 2939 posts
  • Cinematographer
  • Los Angeles

Posted 23 September 2015 - 11:25 PM

I have FCP 7 on OSX Mavericks. Works fine. No reason to believe it wouldn't also work on Yosemite.


  • 0

#3 Tyler Purcell

Tyler Purcell
  • Sustaining Members
  • 3534 posts
  • Other
  • Los Angeles

Posted 23 September 2015 - 11:39 PM

FCP 7 is a 32 bit program, it's very slow and limited. It barely works on Yosemite, but it does function.

I moved to Avid and it's way better once you get use to it. The nice thing is 64 bit processing, so its way faster and has far fewer issues in terms of real time rendering.

Premiere is another option because it's open to different codec's and media formats.
  • 0

#4 Brian Drysdale

Brian Drysdale
  • Basic Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 5027 posts
  • Cinematographer

Posted 24 September 2015 - 01:37 AM

A number of FCP7 users have moved to Lightworks. This is a narrative centred NLE which can natively edit a range of codecs and allows workflows with other sotfware. You've the option of montthly (this seems aimed at the free version users), annual subscriptions or purchase.  It really depends on what works for you.


  • 0

#5 Tyler Purcell

Tyler Purcell
  • Sustaining Members
  • 3534 posts
  • Other
  • Los Angeles

Posted 24 September 2015 - 02:39 AM

A number of FCP7 users have moved to Lightworks.


Really? The industry has moved to Premiere.
  • 0

#6 Brian Drysdale

Brian Drysdale
  • Basic Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 5027 posts
  • Cinematographer

Posted 24 September 2015 - 03:40 AM

Indeed, but not everyone likes Premiere (some have even moved from Premiere)..Lightworks, like AVID has been developed for long form projects  so it can be a matter of selecting the right tool for the work you're doing and works the way you think.

 

If you're a freelance editor knowing the big three A name NLE's will give you more openings for work. Although, some editors using AVID preter to use Lightworks when they can and include it in their skill set..

 

Other Mac options include FCPX and now Resolve 12., Of course, Windows offer Edius and Vegas.

 

I know one place using FCP 7 where each OS upgrade is creating more issues.


Edited by Brian Drysdale, 24 September 2015 - 03:40 AM.

  • 0

#7 Tyler Purcell

Tyler Purcell
  • Sustaining Members
  • 3534 posts
  • Other
  • Los Angeles

Posted 24 September 2015 - 03:57 AM

Strange... As a professional editor, Lightworks is so far off my radar, I thought it was a rental house until I did a google search.

I think every software has it's idiosyncrasies and it's really down to learning them. Then you can either embrace or push away. As a "creative", I've found once the tools are learned, sticking with them is a lot easier. People give up too soon and resort to using tools that nobody else uses because they're simply too lazy or cheap. Yes, you maybe able to edit a tiny bit quicker, but that's only due to lack of education and not due to a software glitch.
  • 0

#8 Brian Drysdale

Brian Drysdale
  • Basic Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 5027 posts
  • Cinematographer

Posted 24 September 2015 - 06:56 AM

Lightworks was one of the orginal two NLEs and was head to head with AVID for a number of years. It was aimed at film editors, however, it suffered from poor management decsions over the years.

 

I suspect it's how Lightworks presents the media and alkows you to organise the way you want that long term users like, together with the well known console (which you don't need - you can drag and drop etc, but it moves things up a gear).. Lightworks has the same learning curve as other professional NLEs, so not an easy option in that regard, 

 

In the end, editors do tend to use programs that they're used to.


Edited by Brian Drysdale, 24 September 2015 - 07:07 AM.

  • 0

#9 Brian Drysdale

Brian Drysdale
  • Basic Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 5027 posts
  • Cinematographer

Posted 24 September 2015 - 11:17 AM

Interesting to see the early versions of these things. http://editstock.com...covered-in-2011

 

The early AVID looked rather different to the modern version as well

 


  • 0

#10 Tyler Purcell

Tyler Purcell
  • Sustaining Members
  • 3534 posts
  • Other
  • Los Angeles

Posted 24 September 2015 - 12:43 PM

Lightworks was one of the orginal two NLEs and was head to head with AVID for a number of years. It was aimed at film editors, however, it suffered from poor management decsions over the years.


Interesting, yea back when it was originally released, I was editing film and tape to tape linear. I didn't start NLE editing until Media 100 came around in 96' because broadcasters started investing. I used Avid a bunch in the late 90's as I worked for a post house that used it. But for my own projects, I stuck with the then developing Final Cut Pro, because it allowed for raw editing of DV material without transcoding.
 

I suspect it's how Lightworks presents the media and alkows you to organise the way you want that long term users like, together with the well known console (which you don't need - you can drag and drop etc, but it moves things up a gear).. Lightworks has the same learning curve as other professional NLEs, so not an easy option in that regard.


Or maybe it's just a UK thing.
  • 0

#11 Brian Drysdale

Brian Drysdale
  • Basic Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 5027 posts
  • Cinematographer

Posted 24 September 2015 - 02:07 PM

Lightworks has had a number of US feature film editors using it, best known being regular user Thelma Schoonmaker.


  • 0

#12 Tyler Purcell

Tyler Purcell
  • Sustaining Members
  • 3534 posts
  • Other
  • Los Angeles

Posted 24 September 2015 - 05:17 PM

Thelma is kinda old school, she uses it because she likes the bench editor interface, which exists for all systems.
  • 0

#13 Brian Drysdale

Brian Drysdale
  • Basic Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 5027 posts
  • Cinematographer

Posted 24 September 2015 - 06:04 PM

Although the LIghtworks controller is generally regarded as the best one. However, I suspect it's the flexable interface which may one of the interesting differences compared to other NLEs. you can have a totaly rigid layout or a fridge door layout with material scattered anywhere across the screen as you work with it. Whichever suits the way you like working.

 

Some editors thoughts on using it. https://library.crea...id/lightworks/1


Edited by Brian Drysdale, 24 September 2015 - 06:12 PM.

  • 0


The Slider

Willys Widgets

Metropolis Post

FJS International, LLC

Wooden Camera

Visual Products

Media Blackout - Custom Cables and AKS

Rig Wheels Passport

Abel Cine

CineTape

Gamma Ray Digital Inc

CineLab

Broadcast Solutions Inc

Technodolly

Tai Audio

Ritter Battery

Aerial Filmworks

Glidecam

Paralinx LLC

rebotnix Technologies

Wooden Camera

Aerial Filmworks

Technodolly

Metropolis Post

Gamma Ray Digital Inc

The Slider

Glidecam

Ritter Battery

FJS International, LLC

Media Blackout - Custom Cables and AKS

Abel Cine

Tai Audio

CineLab

Rig Wheels Passport

Paralinx LLC

Broadcast Solutions Inc

CineTape

Willys Widgets

Visual Products

rebotnix Technologies