Jump to content


Photo

Monochramatic Scenes


  • Please log in to reply
3 replies to this topic

#1 Ckulakov

Ckulakov
  • Basic Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 193 posts
  • Student
  • Washington D.C.

Posted 23 May 2005 - 07:08 PM

The scenes from Spielbergs "Catch Me If You Can" in the home of Frank and his family and the Russian winter scenes in Moscow from "The Bourne Supremacy" all looked bleak, cool, and 'monochrome', and even the directors characterized the scenes as being 'monochrome'. But how can they be monochrome when you see blues, greens and whites all in one frame?
This has been bugging me and I whant to learn what I can do to make my scenes look 'monochrome' by their standards or the way they look in those scenes.
What type of procedures, filters, or colors will I need to make a scene look cool, bleak, and monochrome?

Thank You in advance

Constantine Kulakov
  • 0

#2 drew_town

drew_town
  • Sustaining Members
  • 383 posts
  • Camera Operator
  • Southeast US

Posted 23 May 2005 - 07:20 PM

I think in those instances the directors were referring to an overall dominate color. Bourne Supremacy would be white. It's not technically a monochrome ("one color") but it is dominantly white. If you want that look it'll come through with set design, art design, wardrobe, and makeup. If you want to true monochrome, the image is often tinted or black and white.
  • 0

#3 Dominic Case

Dominic Case
  • Basic Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 1357 posts
  • Other
  • Sydney Australia

Posted 23 May 2005 - 07:39 PM

Art direction is often the key to the colour "look" of scenes, whether bright colour themes (as in Hero) or the desaturated monochrome(ish) look you mention.

Look out of the window in winter - it IS more or less monchrome, you don't have to do much more. Put people in grey overcoats, desaturate everything that's left with a bit of snow or mist, and it's there.

If that's not enough, then the magic of a DI will change the colours. But why change something digitally if you can photograph somethoing the way it is by working with the set designer and art director.
  • 0

#4 drew_town

drew_town
  • Sustaining Members
  • 383 posts
  • Camera Operator
  • Southeast US

Posted 23 May 2005 - 08:15 PM

I also think that overall tones in art design works on more of a subtle and unconscious level where a monochrome look can be more in-your-face. The snow in Bourne Supremacy really helps to calm the movie down. Paul Greengrass in his commentary says he likes it for its truthful and honest attributes. That's something that can really add to your story. Granted that Hero was rather in-your-face with its color schemes, but I think generally that's the case. M. Night Shyamalan uses colors to symbolize ideas in his movies.
  • 0


The Slider

Willys Widgets

Paralinx LLC

Gamma Ray Digital Inc

Ritter Battery

Media Blackout - Custom Cables and AKS

Glidecam

Rig Wheels Passport

Metropolis Post

FJS International, LLC

CineTape

Abel Cine

rebotnix Technologies

Aerial Filmworks

CineLab

Visual Products

Wooden Camera

Technodolly

New Pro Video - New and Used Equipment

Broadcast Solutions Inc

Tai Audio

New Pro Video - New and Used Equipment

Ritter Battery

Paralinx LLC

Gamma Ray Digital Inc

Aerial Filmworks

Abel Cine

FJS International, LLC

Broadcast Solutions Inc

CineLab

Tai Audio

Willys Widgets

Glidecam

The Slider

Metropolis Post

Wooden Camera

Visual Products

Rig Wheels Passport

Media Blackout - Custom Cables and AKS

rebotnix Technologies

CineTape

Technodolly