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#1 vivian xavier

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Posted 30 September 2015 - 04:14 AM

Hello, i am currently prepping for a music video and there are quite a considerable number of shots that require a female and male model to be immersed in water. It is similar in effect o the music video "No Ordinary Love" by the band Sade. You can check it out here.

 

 

 

However, we do not have the budget or the equipment for underwater photography. However, i was thinking of shooting from outside a water tank big enough to house the model and environment wit ha lighting setup; yet to be determined because of variable frame rates.

 

The image i want to film need to be similar to these.   

underwater photography pic 1.jpg

underwater photography pic 2.jpg

underwater photography pic 3.jpg

 

My concern is...

 

1) filming tighter shots without diving in with a camera housing as none exist in Pakistan, where i am         based.  My answer was to move the model closer to the class for those shots or use longer lenses. 

 

2) Adding a cloud tank element within the shot to make the environment more harsh. I am less worried about this , but wanted opinions regarding safety, and/optical issues arising because of mixing two special effects techniques.


Edited by vivian xavier, 30 September 2015 - 04:16 AM.

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#2 dan kessler

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Posted 30 September 2015 - 11:10 AM

I don't think you can mix cloud tank elements with the live model in the same set-up.

Each type of water effect is quite beautiful, but you have two entirely different scales, each working best with different frame rates and lenses.

Cloud tanks rely on the illusion of scale, making us believe little puffs of ink or paint are gigantic clouds in the sky.  A live model in the
same tank would reveal the true size of the paint squirts.

Also, those tanks rely on a stable, calm volume of liquid, sometimes layers of static liquids with different densities.  Too much turbulence would just muddy everything up.

Plus, the technique is very labor-intensive, requiring numerous retakes, with a fresh tank of water each time.

Oh yeah, and the model probably wouldn't like it, either.

Shoot the elements separately.
 


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#3 vivian xavier

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Posted 30 September 2015 - 12:12 PM

Hey Dan Kessler, 

 

Thank you for replying to my post and clarifying things for me. I appreciate that.  I will shoot the effects separately.  But am i good for the water tank technique where i should from outside the tank? Or is there something you suggest i try? Or even add to the existing technique that would add to it?

 

 

Thank you for all your help.

 

Cheers.


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#4 dan kessler

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Posted 30 September 2015 - 04:28 PM

I'm no authority on underwater photography, but shooting from outside a tank seems like it ought to work.

The camera lens is shooting through a transparent barrier either way.


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