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Drying home processed film


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#1 Dan Salzmann

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Posted 24 May 2005 - 11:21 AM

I am thinking about shooting and developping some tests on optical sound stock and wondered how those on this forum that are involved in home processing are drying the developped film.
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#2 Robert Hughes

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Posted 24 May 2005 - 12:09 PM

I squeegie it off with my fingers and literally throw it over the wash line in my basement - it's inelegant but functional. If it's important footage I make sure it's thoroughly washed, including a hypo clear step and the last few rinses with filtered water, ending with a Photo-flo solution prior to drying.
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#3 John Pytlak RIP

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Posted 24 May 2005 - 02:42 PM

Obviously if you "air dry" the film, you should do it in a clean area with a minimum of airborne dirt particles that could stick to the wet film.

Film is dry when it loses its opalescence (cloudy look) and just begins to have a bit of "positive" curl --- a slight "cupping" of the film with the emulsion side at the bottom of the "cup". This usually occurs when the film is equilibrated to about 50% relative humidity.
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#4 K Borowski

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Posted 24 May 2005 - 02:43 PM

If you're drying it, a clothing line works as well as the rung for the shower curtain in the bathroom. You have to gently coil the wet film and wrap it around the line or rung. Make sure you don't have the emulsion facing inwards as it can be damaged by the line or rung. Have the more durable base facing inwards. Be very gentle so as not to scratch the footage. You can use a few pieces of tape at contact points to keep the film from unraveling and falling to the floor. What is the longest length your sound tracks will be? If you are using 400 feet of 16- or 35mm you might need to devise some sort of custom drying method. Or it is possible that if you have a movie lab around they'll be nice and help you dry the film during off hours.

Regards.

~Karl Borowski
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#5 Robert Hughes

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Posted 24 May 2005 - 04:24 PM

If you air dry your film, don't be sanding furniture or grinding machine tools in the area. And don't let your cat batt at the film, she'll pull it all down onto the floor (at least mine does).

Seriously, I have trouble dealing with more than 80' of film using a clothesline for drying. If you are intending to use the footage for anything more important than home movies you should probably build a drying cabinet.
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#6 Michael Carter

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Posted 14 June 2005 - 04:10 PM

There is a 200 foot motorized film dryer shown on my web site......... a 50 foot one as well but that one is hand cranked.

studiocarter.com or in a folder under that name: 16mmoviemaking.com
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