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Scared about s16mm under or overexposures


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#1 Sander Ferdinand

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Posted 20 October 2015 - 09:47 PM

Hello guys,

 

First of all, good to see people still use s16mm!

 

I have been thinking about shooting my own short film on 16mm and wondered if I could use my 35mm photo camera to prepare some shots for it.

 

Will my photo camera (Canon A-1), loaded with 500 ASA, a 50mm lens (prime) on 2.8T yield roughly the same results as a Aaton XTR (s16mm) loaded with Vision3 500T and a 50mm at 2.8T (some zoom lens) in terms of lighting. I understand that the colors/grain/DOF/distortion and such would be different. The goal is to get a rough estimation for my exposures to rule out the possibility of wasting precious film stock on ruined shots (Too dark, too bright).

 

As a beginner, I will be practicing lighting/shadows in certain conditions. When the time comes I will be using a lightmeter as well of course, but having the shots planned a little beforehand allows me to get the look I am going for and giving me confidence in the end result.

 

Thanks,

Sander


Edited by Sander Ferdinand, 20 October 2015 - 09:59 PM.

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#2 Dirk DeJonghe

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Posted 20 October 2015 - 10:52 PM

Sander, in order to get confident in using the exposure meter I suggest you read Ansel Adams 'The Negative'. It is about B&W photography but 100 % applicable to motion picture. 


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#3 David Mullen ASC

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Posted 20 October 2015 - 11:32 PM

Yes, shooting the same MP stock in an 8-perf 35mm still camera, processed the same way (ECN2 not C41), would teach you about exposing for Super-16 if you match the f-stop and shutter speed (usually 1/50th to get close to the 1/48th shutter time of a 24 fps camera with a 180 degree shutter angle.)

 

Though without printer lights from a work print, I'm not sure how you'd measure whether you exposed it correctly or not just by looking at a scan of the negative, other than just shoot a grey scale in flat light at the correct ASA / shutter time to match shooting in Super-16, as some sort of base image to judge your other exposures against.


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#4 Jay Young

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Posted 21 October 2015 - 05:16 AM

I'm curious as how to get ENC2 process from a lab with only 8 feet of film.  If one were to buy the new "cinefilm" for 35mm still camera, or even take some 5219 and load it in a still camera, is there a lab that would process such a small amount?


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#5 Andries Molenaar

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Posted 21 October 2015 - 05:40 AM

A long time ago friend used a Rollei 16 camera to expose 16mm 1perf to get the film look in his stills. The Rollei 16 takes 16mm 1perf like many other. It is a nice camera but only has automatic program exposure. Better would be to use a Kiev or Mamiya 16 who have manual adjust aperture and exposuretime. The grain is different though as the camera sideway almost uses three frames.


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#6 Kenny N Suleimanagich

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Posted 21 October 2015 - 09:36 AM

Cinestill 800T yields an image very close to 5219. The knee is slightly steeper, but in terms of grain and latitude it comes pretty close. They also make a 50D. It's just Kodak MP with the anti-halation backing removed. 


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#7 David Mullen ASC

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Posted 21 October 2015 - 10:27 AM

Cinestill uses MP stock with the anti-halation backing removed and processes it in C41:

http://cinestillfilm...-cinestill-film

 

Which is probably why they rate the 500T at 800 ASA.

 

I'm sure that would still be instructive to shoot.

 

There's a lab called Double Exposure Ltd. in Cleveland, OH I found online, I don't know if they are legit, but they say they do ECN2 processing:

https://xxltdlab.wordpress.com

 

Keep one thing in mind: negative film loves exposure, so if you err, err on the side of overexposure, not underexposure.


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#8 Satsuki Murashige

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Posted 21 October 2015 - 12:40 PM

The thing is that Cinestill film is so forgiving of mis-exposure that I don't think it's a good tool to learn how to expose film properly. For previewing what 7219/5219 will look like, I think it's great.

For learning and testing your metering technique, I would start with some color reversal film like Fuji Velvia or Provia. Once you can nail exposures consistently on reversal, switching to color negative should be a piece of cake. Just remember to err on the side of underexposure for reversal, and on the side of overexposure for negative.
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#9 Chris Burke

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Posted 22 October 2015 - 10:36 PM

I have seen comparisons of 5219 and Portra 400 stills side by side. While the 5219 is the winner, the Portra 400 is rather close in comparison. I believe that the emulsion is very close to the Vision 3 MP stock. So, shooting a roll of Portra may be an easier way to get what you are looking for. 


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