Jump to content




Photo

tight crew


  • Please log in to reply
23 replies to this topic

#1 David Edward Keen

David Edward Keen
  • Basic Members
  • PipPip
  • 95 posts
  • Student
  • New York City

Posted 02 November 2015 - 06:46 AM

" PTA is known to rely on tight crews and ensembles of actors because it allows him to give the actors room to adjust the story. His scripts are his own, so he has no loyalty to their word over their intent."
_____

What is meant by "tight crew" here and how does that connect to "having room to adjust the story"?
  • 0




#2 Matthew Padraic Barr

Matthew Padraic Barr
  • Basic Members
  • PipPip
  • 47 posts
  • Cinematographer
  • New York City

Posted 02 November 2015 - 06:58 AM

Oftentimes, directors work with much of the same crew on every
movie they make, which is probably what they meant by "tight crew."
I know from my own experiences that shows always run much more
smoothly when you work with a crew that you worked with before,
so I completely understand why directors do that.

Edited by Matthew Padraic Barr, 02 November 2015 - 06:59 AM.

  • 0

#3 David Edward Keen

David Edward Keen
  • Basic Members
  • PipPip
  • 95 posts
  • Student
  • New York City

Posted 02 November 2015 - 10:15 AM

Oh, so the time saved by a tight crew can be given to things like adjusting the story?
  • 0

#4 Phil Rhodes

Phil Rhodes
  • Sustaining Members
  • 11234 posts
  • Other

Posted 02 November 2015 - 10:56 AM

I'm not sure it's standard terminology. I'd just assume it meant "small", which can also be a good thing sometimes.


  • 0

#5 Brian Drysdale

Brian Drysdale
  • Basic Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 4745 posts
  • Cinematographer

Posted 02 November 2015 - 10:58 AM

Adjusting the story is probably more allowing space to allow the actors to explore their characters, rather then adjusting the main story line. Also allows for improvisation.


Edited by Brian Drysdale, 02 November 2015 - 10:59 AM.

  • 0

#6 Bill DiPietra

Bill DiPietra
  • Sustaining Members
  • 2267 posts
  • Cinematographer
  • New York City

Posted 02 November 2015 - 12:28 PM

I'm not sure it's standard terminology. I'd just assume it meant "small", which can also be a good thing sometimes.

 

That kind of term is used in my line of work as well and usually means that the people involved have a very smooth rhythm going to the point that very little verbal exchange is required.


  • 1

#7 David Edward Keen

David Edward Keen
  • Basic Members
  • PipPip
  • 95 posts
  • Student
  • New York City

Posted 02 November 2015 - 01:49 PM

like a tight rock band


  • 0

#8 Tyler Purcell

Tyler Purcell
  • Sustaining Members
  • 2369 posts
  • Other
  • Los Angeles

Posted 02 November 2015 - 02:09 PM

Yea, like a tight rock band.

On a film set, if everyone is trying to learn how each other works, the director can be side tracked with ancillary things that pull them away from the actors. So it's great to have a tight crew, that doesn't need any real guidance, so the director can focus on their actors and telling the story instead.
  • 1

#9 David Edward Keen

David Edward Keen
  • Basic Members
  • PipPip
  • 95 posts
  • Student
  • New York City

Posted 04 November 2015 - 07:32 AM

thanks all. Tyler you've got the family name of a great composer. check the family tree! 


  • 0

#10 Gregory Irwin

Gregory Irwin
  • Sustaining Members
  • 529 posts
  • 1st Assistant Camera
  • Work is based in Los Angeles but I live elsewhere.

Posted 04 November 2015 - 11:20 AM

It's fantastic to be a part of a tight crew. My camera department has been together (a few of us) for almost 35 years. The newest full time member is at 10 years. We have spent more time together than we have with our families. We've been through weddings, child births, divorces, funerals, etc that brings a team very close and that translates to professionalism and efficiency on set. The entire company witnesses how well our crew works together and respects one another. I know how lucky I am to have this. I wouldn't trade my team for anything.

G
  • 2

#11 Mark Dunn

Mark Dunn
  • Basic Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 2182 posts
  • Other
  • London

Posted 04 November 2015 - 11:59 AM

It's fantastic to be a part of a tight crew. My camera department has been together (a few of us) for almost 35 years. The newest full time member is at 10 years. We have spent more time together than we have with our families. We've been through weddings, child births, divorces, funerals, etc that brings a team very close and that translates to professionalism and efficiency on set. The entire company witnesses how well our crew works together and respects one another. I know how lucky I am to have this. I wouldn't trade my team for anything.

G

A bit of a closed shop then.

Sorry.


  • 0

#12 Richard Boddington

Richard Boddington
  • Sustaining Members
  • 5195 posts
  • Director

Posted 04 November 2015 - 07:12 PM

A bit of a closed shop then.

Sorry.

 

Well on the one hand I can see the benefits to it in film, and I'm glad Gregory has such a relationship with his crew.  But yes, frustrating to those trying to break in, and or move up, etc.  I have used many of the same people over again, and keep others on the permanent do not call list.

 

Funny thing if you're the director....you cannot afford to get chummy with any member of the crew.  You need to be able to "correct" that person on set if needed, and you can't do that to your buddy.  Everyone needs to be kept at arms length.  Although this is no different from any managerial position, VPs in a company can't be best buddies with the people that work for them, only to find they have to fire one of them at some stage.

 

I certainly would not begrudge the camera dept from being best friends and going out after work etc.  Especially if on a distant location.

 

R,

 

PS: Besides I will plant a small listening device on one of them so I can hear what they're saying about me. :)


  • 1

#13 Justin Hayward

Justin Hayward
  • Sustaining Members
  • 720 posts
  • Director
  • Chicago, IL.

Posted 04 November 2015 - 09:18 PM

A bit of a closed shop then.

 

 

I'm sure Mr. Irwin can attest this is pretty common with successful directors.  Look how many Spielberg movies Mark Spath 1st AC'd, and from his IMDB profile it looks like he was brought in by Janusz Kaminski from their work on "Cool As Ice."  When you gather a truly well-oiled-machine, it's probably hard to change it up.


  • 0

#14 Gregory Irwin

Gregory Irwin
  • Sustaining Members
  • 529 posts
  • 1st Assistant Camera
  • Work is based in Los Angeles but I live elsewhere.

Posted 04 November 2015 - 10:50 PM

A bit of a closed shop then.
Sorry.


This comment makes me sad. What this shows is not a closed shop ( I don't think that way) but rather a loyalty and respect for one another. Would you want Liverpool or Arsenal to trade their star players every year in order to not have a closed shop? That would be crazy! Same for us. And beyond everything, we have a college trainee from my alma mater on every movie we can who learns the proper way to work and goes on to have a prosperous career of their own. So, let there be no question, we give back and promote our future generation.

G
  • 0

#15 Stuart Brereton

Stuart Brereton
  • Basic Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 2575 posts
  • Cinematographer
  • Los Angeles

Posted 04 November 2015 - 11:15 PM

Would you want Liverpool or Arsenal to trade their star players every year 

I'm very glad that Arsenal no longer trade their star players every year for any reason....


  • 0

#16 Phil Rhodes

Phil Rhodes
  • Sustaining Members
  • 11234 posts
  • Other

Posted 05 November 2015 - 04:39 AM

This is one of the problems with a constant diet of no-budget, one or two-day shoots. One attempts, of course, to keep a crew together, but it's incredibly difficult - both because people's availability ends up being so patchy, and because of the constantly varying requirements. One day we might be out with four or five people in a proper camera department, the next it's one camera and a sound guy.

 

Naturally there's a skill to that as well, and it puts a lot of pressure on people to know what they're doing and to work according to something like a standard approach, but the idea that every show is an opportunity to hire all your best buddies is not, I'm afraid, something that's universal.

 

P


  • 0

#17 Gregory Irwin

Gregory Irwin
  • Sustaining Members
  • 529 posts
  • 1st Assistant Camera
  • Work is based in Los Angeles but I live elsewhere.

Posted 05 November 2015 - 09:22 AM

There is one point I need to make clear regarding my camera department. I would never hire my "buddies". That would have been a grave mistake. I hired the best people for the job and then over time, we became close. As a department head, if I do my job correctly from the beginning, a large part of my job is done.

This bears repeating: Hire smart, not your friends. If I have to spend over one minute managing my crew members, then I'm micro managing. If that has to happen then I didn't do the first part of my job. I didn't hire smart. It's a very simple managerial philosophy that I truly believe in and practice everyday. Trust the people you hire and allow their talents to shine on their own. My job is then to keep the team as a whole on goal. I am still ultimately responsible for the performance of my team but this managerial style makes my world very easy.

G

Edited by Gregory Irwin, 05 November 2015 - 09:24 AM.

  • 1

#18 David Edward Keen

David Edward Keen
  • Basic Members
  • PipPip
  • 95 posts
  • Student
  • New York City

Posted 05 November 2015 - 03:10 PM

very true in my profession, violinist. as is also true the grouping together in tight ensembles whenever possible, which is seldom.


  • 0

#19 Phil Rhodes

Phil Rhodes
  • Sustaining Members
  • 11234 posts
  • Other

Posted 05 November 2015 - 03:16 PM

Well, within a reasonable interpretation of "buddies." Quite often I'm lucky not to be entirely on my own!


  • 0

#20 Mark Dunn

Mark Dunn
  • Basic Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 2182 posts
  • Other
  • London

Posted 05 November 2015 - 03:22 PM

This comment makes me sad. What this shows is not a closed shop ( I don't think that way)

I thought the 'sorry' rider clarified it a bit. It's irony. I must remember not to use it on Americans.


  • 0


Technodolly

Tai Audio

rebotnix Technologies

Broadcast Solutions Inc

Abel Cine

Glidecam

Visual Products

CineLab

Paralinx LLC

Willys Widgets

Zylight

Aerial Filmworks

Ritter Battery

Rig Wheels Passport

Pro 8mm

The Slider

CineTape

Broadcast Solutions Inc

Pro 8mm

Abel Cine

Aerial Filmworks

Paralinx LLC

Zylight

The Slider

Glidecam

Ritter Battery

rebotnix Technologies

Visual Products

Technodolly

Tai Audio

CineTape

Rig Wheels Passport

Willys Widgets

CineLab