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Green Screen Poster/Billboard HELP!

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#1 Jim Alix Heru

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Posted 08 November 2015 - 02:41 PM

Greetings Cine-Buffs

 

My next short film is a one room set up, and requires the room to be filled with large movie posters on the wall etc.

 

Has anyone had experience  with using green screen for wall posters or billboards or anything similar? and if so how would you go about shooting this and then the post production on this?

 

Any help would be greatful!


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#2 Bill DiPietra

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Posted 08 November 2015 - 04:08 PM

I realize this is not what you are asking, but wouldn't it be simpler just to acquire the posters and actually put them on the walls?...


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#3 Jim Alix Heru

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Posted 08 November 2015 - 05:11 PM

I realize this is not what you are asking, but wouldn't it be simpler just to acquire the posters and actually put them on the walls?...

 

Yes you're obviously correct.

 

However they need to be original art work posters, not ones you can just buy.


Edited by Jim Alix Heru, 08 November 2015 - 05:12 PM.

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#4 David Mullen ASC

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Posted 08 November 2015 - 05:16 PM

If they are original art, wouldn't they be paintings, not posters?


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#5 Jim Alix Heru

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Posted 08 November 2015 - 05:58 PM

If they are original art, wouldn't they be paintings, not posters?


This is becoming completely irrelevant and off topic.
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#6 Jay Young

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Posted 09 November 2015 - 05:59 AM

This is becoming completely irrelevant and off topic.

 

Lets try again.

 

I think what the above persons are saying is that it may be a difficult task to key out all of those green areas with any artwork. 

Secondly, the artwork that you DO create to fill in the green area could just as easily be printed out poster size, hung on a wall and actually photographed.

This I also believe is the way to go, as it will save time.  You don't have to worry about shadows or flat lighting the green screen, and you don't have to worry

about all of the computer work in post production. 


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#7 aapo lettinen

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Posted 09 November 2015 - 11:11 AM

I second that it would be much easier to just print out the posters and use them on the walls instead of relying on vfx on this. if the room has lots of those posters and not just couple of them you may need to green screen the whole wall and depending on camera moves and angles you may need match moving instead of simple keying/tracking. with green screen you always risk the edge quality and lighting matching and may have to compromise shots because of the separate greenscr lights and post prod needs.

 

if you have really good vfx artists it may be possible to rotoscope the actor without using green screen but that is very shot dependent and takes LOTS of work. it does not need separate screen or lighting however as long as the edges are contrasty and noise free enough


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#8 aapo lettinen

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Posted 09 November 2015 - 11:22 AM

I'm most worried about defocused green screen poster areas on the walls, they are much more difficult to key realistically than if the green screen edges are on focus. then you have both the blurry green screen/wall edges and the green screen/actor edges to worry about, and it is more difficult to handle them both perfectly because they need different settings for the keyer. you may need to rotoscope either one of them to get the edges right and thus it may be simpler to just green screen the whole actor/actress so you can add the whole background and blur it in post


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#9 David Mullen ASC

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Posted 09 November 2015 - 12:11 PM

I realize you mean that these are fictitious posters, not from real movies... anyway, I agree with everyone, just print them out.  Even a mediocre print job would probably look better than a post visual efx unless this is only for one wide shot and for the rest, that wall is off-camera.  Or maybe in your tighter coverage, only one or two posters would be in the background, so those could be real (and would be in soft focus) so you wouldn't have to deal with compositing issues, and only in the wide shot, would there be an effect to add more posters.  But in general, I suggest doing it for real.


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#10 aapo lettinen

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Posted 09 November 2015 - 04:40 PM

if some of the printed posters looks bad in the final movie for some reason you can have your vfx guys rotoscope and replace that single one. it is very SLOOOW work but for single images it's not a problem and 99% of cases the prints will do fine without any refinement :)   


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#11 Daniel Meier

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Posted 09 December 2015 - 08:30 AM

Why not just put track marks on the walls, where the digital posters are supposed to be attached in the compositing software?

And then let the software key the position/rotation/scale of the real footage marks and apply your image file.


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#12 aapo lettinen

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Posted 17 December 2015 - 07:53 AM

Why not just put track marks on the walls, where the digital posters are supposed to be attached in the compositing software?

And then let the software key the position/rotation/scale of the real footage marks and apply your image file.

there is lots of work involved in rotoscoping the person's hair etc with good enough quality so that you would have good enough edge against the posters. remember that in tighter shots you will see the edge quality very clearly and it will immediately scream fake if there is anything wrong with it. in tighter shots it is also difficult to get enough tracking markers in frame to be able to get track on all the axis needed


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#13 aapo lettinen

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Posted 17 December 2015 - 07:56 AM

so it would be easier to have SOMETHING on the wall which is resembling the poster well enough most of the time so that IF it looks fake in one single shot you can rotoscope+replace only that poster and 95% of the rest can be the physical printed ones which will pass easily in most of the shots anyway


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#14 Brian Drysdale

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Posted 17 December 2015 - 08:15 AM

If they're art work for fictitious films, it would best if your art department created them. Green screen only makes sense if the posters etc are a VFX and to be doing more than just being passively stuck on the wall.


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