Jump to content




Photo

Which camera should I buy?


  • Please log in to reply
3 replies to this topic

#1 Ethan Bowes

Ethan Bowes

    New

  • Basic Members
  • Pip
  • 6 posts
  • Cinematographer

Posted 15 November 2015 - 06:10 AM

I am looking to start shooting films, with a preference for older 70s and 80s art film. I've noticed a lot of people recommending either the Lumix GH4 or the Black Box in my price range (anywhere below 2000 dollars). I want the best quality film-like camera on the market, so I can get a feel while I practice before moving towards arri studio or even older 35mm 35 2-BL. Are there any other camera's that are better than a GH4 or similar? What interests me about the GH4 (so I've heard) is that taking the 4k video compresses down into a more detailed 1080 image. It also is 1/4 film SLR, and should work with most lenses out there. Last of all, what would be the most film-like lens for nature and portraits. Should I be looking for either prime or anamorphic lenses, and if so, which ones?

Cheers.


Edited by Ethan Bowes, 15 November 2015 - 06:11 AM.

  • 0




#2 Simon Wyss

Simon Wyss
  • Basic Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 1143 posts
  • Other
  • Basel, Switzerland

Posted 15 November 2015 - 11:18 AM

Most film-like? Uhm, a film camera  . . .

 

1970s and 1980s art film? Uhm, Andrej Warhola is dead, the color films have been discontinued long ago.

 

You can still work with black and white stocks and ciné cameras. That will connect you to everybody between Moscow and Los Angeles, back through the years until 1887 when film was invented. Spherical prime lenses, of course


  • 0

#3 Satsuki Murashige

Satsuki Murashige
  • Sustaining Members
  • 3081 posts
  • Cinematographer
  • San Francisco, CA

Posted 15 November 2015 - 01:29 PM

If you want to eventually move up to 35mm cameras, then why not start with 16mm? Get an Arri S, Bolex Rx5, Canon Scoopic 16MS, or Krasnogorsk K3 and shoot 100' rolls of Tri-X for black and white and Kodak Vision 3 for color. These will translate directly to 35mm film and make the transition relatively easy for you. Added benefit is the cameras should be a few hundred $ US, leaving you extra money left over for film stock, processing, and scanning.

A digital camera will be equally good and cheaper for practicing composition, lighting, and editing but it won't teach you anything about how to shoot celluloid.
  • 0

#4 Tyler Purcell

Tyler Purcell
  • Sustaining Members
  • 2369 posts
  • Other
  • Los Angeles

Posted 15 November 2015 - 01:40 PM

I personally would buy a BOLEX EBM and start shooting 100ft daylight spools for practice. I think you'll gain more knowledge for shooting on film then you will with any digital camera. Going from digital to film is a huge shift because you don't know what you've got until a few days later which means, you've gotta have the skills on set to get the image.

Now, if you wish to learn about lighting, composition and practice without the cost of film and processing, the closest inexpensive camera is actually the camera I use, the Blackmagic Pocket. You can buy cinema glass for cheap money these days from Rokinon. I'd even buy a light meter and learn how to expose using that vs the histogram and zebra's. Plus, the file sizes aren't so huge like a 4k camera. So you aren't wasting card's and hard drive space. Plus, you'll learn how to work with RAW material in post, which is how your film will come back from the lab after it's scanned.

So you can learn how to shoot in a film way without shooting film, which is pretty cool.

Most of the other still cameras that shoot video like the GH4, they're just toys and won't really teach you much outside of composition. Plus, none of them are very cinematic. I've used the A7S, GH4, 5D, 7D, and none of them really impressed me. Sure the A7S has amazing low light capabilities, but at the cost of horrible rolling shutter and harsh white/highlight clipping.

If you wish to learn more about the pocket camera, check out my video about it.


  • 0


Paralinx LLC

The Slider

CineTape

Ritter Battery

Tai Audio

Pro 8mm

Technodolly

Willys Widgets

rebotnix Technologies

Rig Wheels Passport

Broadcast Solutions Inc

Glidecam

Abel Cine

Aerial Filmworks

Visual Products

CineLab

Zylight

CineTape

Rig Wheels Passport

Abel Cine

Zylight

rebotnix Technologies

The Slider

Technodolly

Willys Widgets

Aerial Filmworks

Broadcast Solutions Inc

CineLab

Tai Audio

Glidecam

Paralinx LLC

Pro 8mm

Ritter Battery

Visual Products