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Lens to match an Angenieux 25-250mm


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#1 Luca Travaglini

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Posted 15 November 2015 - 04:25 PM

Hi everyone,

 

next month I will shoot a tv pilot with 2x Red One M-X cameras. I actually own an Angenieux 25-250mm T3.9 PL mount, that I would like to use on the A-camera. As I can't find a zoom like that to rent in my area, does abybody have experience in matching this lens with other lenses? I am looking for either a zoom or primes to mount on the B-camera that would match enough with the Angenieux lens. I have PL, Nikon F, passive Canon EF mounts. 

 

Thanks


Edited by Luca Travaglini, 15 November 2015 - 04:29 PM.

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#2 Satsuki Murashige

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Posted 15 November 2015 - 07:15 PM

25-250 seems like a better lens to have on B Camera, no? Unless you'll be using the A Camera for close ups and B Camera for the wides. The Zeiss Super Speeds should be a reasonable match regardless.
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#3 Dom Jaeger

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Posted 15 November 2015 - 08:29 PM

The Zeiss Super Speeds should be a reasonable match regardless.


Must have been a combination used on countless films in the 90s.. and beyond..
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#4 David Mullen ASC

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Posted 15 November 2015 - 08:43 PM

Another popular combination back then was the 20-100mm Cooke zoom on one camera (or the 18-100mm) and the 25-250mm Ang. zoom on the other.


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#5 Luca Travaglini

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Posted 15 November 2015 - 08:54 PM

25-250 seems like a better lens to have on B Camera, no? Unless you'll be using the A Camera for close ups and B Camera for the wides. The Zeiss Super Speeds should be a reasonable match regardless.

 

Yes, I agree with you. Being a quite long zoom, I'll probably use the 25-250 for close-ups. I said A camera just because I don't know if I'll have primes or another zoom on the other camera. Anyway, I can easily get a set of Zeiss Super Speeds and I also love them on sharp digital sensors to naturally soften the image. There will be some steadicam work and I need something wider than 25 for a couple of shots, so a prime could be handy. Thank you very much for the advice!


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#6 Luca Travaglini

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Posted 15 November 2015 - 09:01 PM

Another popular combination back then was the 20-100mm Cooke zoom on one camera (or the 18-100mm) and the 25-250mm Ang. zoom on the other.

 

This looks to be an interesting combination too. I can rent those two lenses but I will first evaluate with the steadicam operator if he prefers to have a prime, otherwise I will test them for sure.


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#7 David Mullen ASC

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Posted 15 November 2015 - 09:17 PM

I'm sure the Steadicam operator isn't going to want to use a 5:1 Cooke zoom on his rig... Truth is that back in the past, we lived with some mismatch between zooms and primes because the difference in contrast and sharpness was often lighter than the lightest filter on the market.  Some people back then would do things like put a 1/8 Low Con or 1/8 Double Fog on a prime to match a zoom but that's not a perfect match either, the zoom doesn't halate like those filters did.

 

You could try using the lightweight Angenieux Optimo zooms like the 15-40mm on the Steadicam if you want something less contrasty than a prime.

 

The other thing to keep in mind is that those old 25-250mm zooms varied in quality by f-stop and focal length; outdoors at a decent stop, the zoom would match a prime better than indoors wide-open; matching issues can be affected by whether you are pointed into bright lights too.


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#8 Luca Travaglini

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Posted 15 November 2015 - 09:50 PM

I guess you're right about the steadicam operator. Actually at least three quarters of the production will be shot outdoors, so I am not particularly worried about the aperture. I found that the 25-250 is good enough at t5.6 and very good at t8.0, what concern me is how better would be a prime, a Cooke or a newer Angenieux at such aperture. I'll have to make a test about those options.

Indoors I can always switch to the primes only, the most complicated scenes are outdoors (like a fighting shot) where a zoom could be a time saver.


Edited by Luca Travaglini, 15 November 2015 - 09:52 PM.

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