Jump to content




Photo

Stop-Motion Using Video Camera

#Stop-Motion

  • Please log in to reply
6 replies to this topic

#1 Wassim Nohra

Wassim Nohra

    New

  • Basic Members
  • Pip
  • 3 posts
  • Cinematographer
  • Beirut

Posted 18 November 2015 - 06:00 AM

For a TVC shoot, we are planning to film with Sony F55 or Alexa and the shoot will be in Stop-Motion mode using one of these 2 cameras.

 

How many frames per second should I film in order to get Stop-Motion effect ?? Anyone has experience with Stop-Motion video ??

 

Thank you,


  • 0




#2 Jay Young

Jay Young
  • Basic Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 380 posts
  • Cinematographer
  • Lexington KY

Posted 19 November 2015 - 08:01 AM

I can't find any information about the Sony's stop motion functions.  Apperently, the new Alexa MINI firmware 3.0 will allow stop motion mode, but I can't even find real evidence of that on Arri's website.

 

I'm going to say you'll be better of with a PL mount DSLR for stop motion, but if you wanted to try the Arri out, others would be interested.

 

The "Stop Motion" effect can be gained by shooting each frame twice, for an over exaggerated effect resulting in a feel of 12 frames per second. 


  • 0

#3 Gregg MacPherson

Gregg MacPherson
  • Basic Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 1524 posts
  • Other
  • New Zealand

Posted 19 November 2015 - 10:08 PM

Does stop motion = claymation in terms of the capture process?  Please,  answers only from those who have used this process.


  • 0

#4 Adrian Sierkowski

Adrian Sierkowski
  • Sustaining Members
  • 6771 posts
  • Cinematographer
  • Los Angeles, Ca

Posted 20 November 2015 - 03:06 AM

Yes, stop motion (or go motion) is frame by frame claymation, sometimes though you could do it with any object you need to have-- movement with.

A DSLR isn't the best option, even with cine lenses, there is variation  frame to frame which looks like strobing/pulsing on occasion. It can be worked out, of course, but sometimes isn't ideal. Granted last time i did this was awhile a go on an old Nikon DSLR (D90 i think?) and things maybe have gotten better. In face, I wonder if something like a mirrorless camera, which as it doesn't have a mechanical shutter, may be a little more stable exposure to exposure.

 

It takes a long long time to do, mind you, every second will be 24 exposures and you'll be missing the motion blur, obviously, though that is part of the look.

 

Once you shoot it all you can bring it into any NLE and have it interprit each still as 1 frame. How to tell the NLE to do that would depend upon the specific editing program.

From that, I'd perhaps export it as a master clip without any dissolves or titles or the like-- basically just straight cuts, then bring that into resolve and color correct off of a video file as opposed to a series of stills-- who knows if it would matter but in my head that just makes more sense to do, and easier to deal with in terms of media management. 


  • 0

#5 Dom Jaeger

Dom Jaeger
  • Basic Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 1203 posts
  • Other
  • Melbourne, Australia

Posted 20 November 2015 - 06:36 AM

DSLRs still seem to be the industry standard for stop-motion, Boxtrolls used Canon 5Ds, so did Paranorman before that. Corpse Bride and Aardman films like Shaun the Sheep used Canon 1Ds.
On Coraline the cinematographer tried using machine vision cameras (along with some Nikon DSLRs) to overcome the problems he'd encountered on Corpse Bride, but subsequent Laika studio films went back to just DSLRs. Fantastic Mr Fox also used Nikon DSLRs. Most of the lower budget stop-motion animators I've encountered locally seem to be using 5Ds these days (if not just their iPhone). Maybe it's just because the DSLR workflow has become somewhat standardised, dunno. I'd be curious to hear if anyone has used mirrorless cameras, and how that worked out.

In the old days - before about about 10 years ago - most animation studios still used Mitchells, or even Bolexes. (We used to service Adam Elliot's Bolex that he used to shoot his Oscar winning short Harvie Krumpet, he went on to use Canon 1Ds for his 2009 feature Mary and Max.) Back then normal studio cameras weren't utilised for this sort of work without modifications or additional tools like capping shutters. I don't think any of the major production cameras used for movies these days like Alexas or Sonys have the facility for stop-motion either (though I could be wrong), but at any rate the size of a DSLR is much more suited to this kind of work.

For anyone not up with the latest stop-motion developments, the films by Laika studio (Coraline, Paranorman, Boxtrolls) are remarkable, utilising 3D printers to cast literally thousands of replaceable faces on their puppets, and quite happily mixing practical effects with CGI for certain backgrounds or elements like any other live action movie might. It's an interesting evolution from the more traditional stop-motion of Elliot, Aardman and Fantastic Mr Fox. I highly recommend watching some of their behind the scenes videos.
  • 0

#6 Lance Soltys

Lance Soltys
  • Basic Members
  • PipPip
  • 64 posts
  • Other
  • Chicago, IL

Posted 20 November 2015 - 09:07 AM

Yes, stop motion (or go motion) is frame by frame claymation

 

Hey Adrian,

 

Not that this matters in the grand scheme of things, but I was unsure if you were implying that stop motion and go motion were the same thing, or simply that they both employ frame by frame capture.  Go motion is a relatively short lived process developed by Phil Tippett for ILM.  It utilized mechanically controlled articulation of the puppet to reintroduce motion blur.  Sounds like you've done some stop motion, so you probably already know this, but I just thought I'd clarify.

 

I have not done any stop motion since mirrorless cameras have become popular, and it would be interesting to see how they perform.  Strangely, Dragonframe doesn't seem to explicitly support mirrorless cameras.  They confirm they can be used, but encourage DSLR's.  I'm not sure why.


  • 0

#7 Adrian Sierkowski

Adrian Sierkowski
  • Sustaining Members
  • 6771 posts
  • Cinematographer
  • Los Angeles, Ca

Posted 20 November 2015 - 02:46 PM

Just as you say; that they both use frame by frame-- and I do wish someone would bring go-motion back (hence why i mention it on occasion in the hopes!) .


  • 0


The Slider

Zylight

Abel Cine

Tai Audio

Aerial Filmworks

Visual Products

rebotnix Technologies

CineTape

Technodolly

Ritter Battery

Glidecam

Broadcast Solutions Inc

Pro 8mm

CineLab

Willys Widgets

Rig Wheels Passport

Paralinx LLC

Metropolis Post

Paralinx LLC

Broadcast Solutions Inc

Ritter Battery

Abel Cine

CineLab

Zylight

Rig Wheels Passport

The Slider

Technodolly

Tai Audio

Aerial Filmworks

Glidecam

Metropolis Post

Visual Products

Willys Widgets

CineTape

rebotnix Technologies

Pro 8mm