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How many minutes of film would you need to make a 90 minute feature?


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#1 Jonathan Dzwonar

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Posted 23 November 2015 - 06:00 PM

If you're making a feature film aiming at a 90 minute length, how much film should you plan on using? Disregard extra needed for stunts or massive special effects. I know the shooting ratio is generally 3:1 but you should have plenty of feet ready for shots that just aren't working or when actors really have difficulty with a scene. How much would you guys need to feel comfortable?


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#2 Giray Izcan

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Posted 23 November 2015 - 06:44 PM

3:1 is a pretty conservative ratio - I'm not saying it can't be done but will be pretty limited. It depends on the film too. I wouldn't go below at least 5:1 but 7:1 or 10:1 is more ideal for sure.


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#3 Brian Drysdale

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Posted 23 November 2015 - 06:44 PM

Very few feature films would have a shooting ratio of 3:1. Something like 10:1 or 12:1 is more realistic with modern fast cutting, if not higher.

 

You can get lower shooting ratios if you've got a John Ford style and very experienced actors who can give a performance and have a highly developed sense of timing,


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#4 Bill DiPietra

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Posted 23 November 2015 - 06:47 PM

3:1 is a pretty conservative ratio - I'm not saying it can't be done but will be pretty limited. It depends on the film too. I wouldn't go below at least 5:1 but 7:1 or 10:1 is more ideal for sure.

 

Totally agree.  Plus you have to account for flashed rolls, technical issues (e.g., a light blowing out in the middle of a take,) actors flubbing their lines or the director just wanting to try different things and doing multiple takes.


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#5 Jonathan Dzwonar

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Posted 23 November 2015 - 06:57 PM

So 1200 minutes for a 90 minute feature seems reasonable?


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#6 David Mullen ASC

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Posted 23 November 2015 - 07:21 PM

I've always started with a 10:1 figure, it makes the math easier!

In 35mm 4-perf, a good rule of thumb is a 1000' roll for every page of script.
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#7 Jonathan Dzwonar

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Posted 23 November 2015 - 11:42 PM

The 10:1 makes the most sense. Definitely gives everyone a chance to improvise a bit.


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#8 David Mullen ASC

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Posted 23 November 2015 - 11:57 PM

I've gone as low as 7:1 on a feature and I know one guy who managed a 5:1 ratio, so it's possible but at that point, you are almost doing only one take of many set-ups and cutting a lot in camera. On the 7:1 feature we only shot what was storyboarded with almost no overlapping coverage but we did multiple takes.
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#9 Tyler Purcell

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Posted 24 November 2015 - 01:13 AM

Well believe it or not, if you do proper coverage, the minimal ratio would be 5:1. The moment you add one flubbed line, you increase that ratio. So a conservative ratio on a scripted feature would be around 8:1. I always budget for 10:1 and a lot of my friends feel 10:1 is conservative, but I don't feel the same way. If you have good actors, storyboards and a tight shooting unit, you can shoot 10:1 without a problem.

10:1 ratio would be 900min of stock:

4 perf 35mm = 80,000 ft (80 rolls of film)
3 perf 35mm = 64,000 ft (64 rolls of film)
2 perf 35mm = 40,000 ft (40 rolls of film)
16mm = 32,000 ft (81 rolls of film)
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#10 Kenny N Suleimanagich

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Posted 24 November 2015 - 10:32 AM

10:1 ratio would be 900min of stock:

4 perf 35mm = 80,000 ft (80 rolls of film)
3 perf 35mm = 64,000 ft (64 rolls of film)
2 perf 35mm = 40,000 ft (40 rolls of film)
16mm = 32,000 ft (81 rolls of film)

 

 

 

It should be noted that for these numbers the 35mm rolls in question are 1000' rolls and 16mm are 400'


Edited by Kenny N Suleimanagich, 24 November 2015 - 10:33 AM.

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#11 Bill DiPietra

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Posted 24 November 2015 - 11:04 AM

A 400' roll of regular 16mm is about 12 minutes in length.  Therefore, 75 400' rolls would give him 900 minutes...not 81.  Or were you just figuring in contingency rolls?...


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#12 David Mullen ASC

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Posted 24 November 2015 - 11:59 AM

The charts I see say at 24 fps, you shoot 36 feet per minute in 16mm, so that's 11.1 minutes per 400' roll.
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#13 Bill DiPietra

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Posted 24 November 2015 - 12:10 PM

The charts I see say at 24 fps, you shoot 36 feet per minute in 16mm, so that's 11.1 minutes per 400' roll.

 

Do you have a link, David?  I was trying to find the exact numbers on the Kodak website...


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#14 David Mullen ASC

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Posted 24 November 2015 - 12:29 PM

http://www.davidelki.../cam/tables.htm
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#15 Tyler Purcell

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Posted 24 November 2015 - 12:35 PM

David is right, 400ft rolls of 16 are 11 min.
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#16 Bill DiPietra

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Posted 24 November 2015 - 07:50 PM

 

Thanks, David.


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