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Jessica Jones, Marvel Show on Netflix


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#1 Stuart Brereton

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Posted 24 November 2015 - 09:44 PM

Just recently started watching this show, only a couple of episodes in. Some great ideas and it looks very nice, but one thing continually bugs me.

 

Most of the framing is fairly traditional, but when they shoot overs, they either frame the subject hard to the edge of frame, which means you have 2/3 of the frame filled with someone's shoulder, or they center punch the subject, leaving half the frame empty and apparently devoid of any meaning. It's obviously a deliberate choice, as they do it all the time, but it's distracting as hell and seems to serve no purpose as the rest of the coverage is entirely normal.


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#2 Robin R Probyn

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Posted 25 November 2015 - 01:42 AM

I think there is sometimes a theory.. that if the framing is not visually pleasant and or  jarring .. you,ll remember the show .. I hate to be a luddite,but good story,acting,directing,lighting etc.. you don't need the ,look at me, film school framing..   the camera work should never standout more than the acting/script..  IMHO.. 


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#3 Phil Rhodes

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Posted 25 November 2015 - 05:24 AM

Just watched the trailer. I'm normally very uninterested in comic book stuff but the lead performance is interesting.

 

Whole thing looked a stop under. 

 

P

 

PS - Oh, yeah, and bloody flash banding. Stoppit!


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#4 John E Clark

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Posted 25 November 2015 - 01:20 PM

Just watched the trailer. I'm normally very uninterested in comic book stuff but the lead performance is interesting.

 

Whole thing looked a stop under. 

 

P

 

PS - Oh, yeah, and bloody flash banding. Stoppit!

 

According to IMDB, if it is correct... it was shot with a Red Epic Dragon... doesn't that have 'global' shutter options? Is there a 'light loss cost' with global shutter?

 

I think the 'look' is intended to be neo-digital-noir...

 

I've liked the show... I like the 'hancock-isque' of a broken super heroine... quite different from the Laura Croft style.


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#5 David Mullen ASC

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Posted 25 November 2015 - 01:53 PM

The Red cameras all have a rolling shutter.  There is a "motion mount" system that can be attached which acts as a global shutter, but it has an overall light loss.


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#6 Bill DiPietra

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Posted 25 November 2015 - 02:19 PM

Just watched the trailer.

 

I was liking it until I saw the A-train.  There is no subway car on that line that comes anywhere close to looking that new & pristine!


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#7 John E Clark

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Posted 25 November 2015 - 03:15 PM

 

I was liking it until I saw the A-train.  There is no subway car on that line that comes anywhere close to looking that new & pristine!

 

So. Cal is like New York as a popular backdrop for Hollywood films/TV shows... and I do sometimes drop out of my 'willingly suspended disbelief' mode when a character needs to get from one place to another in LA... and takes a few 'minutes'... when I know it would take an hour or 2 just to go 10 miles... then there's parking... heck I've had the meter maid/man hit my car with in 'seconds' of parking... to write out a ticket... and these movie jokers seem to be able to 1) find parking, and 2) park almost anywhere with impunity... except of course when parking violations are a plot device...


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#8 Bill DiPietra

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Posted 25 November 2015 - 03:52 PM

Yeah, the native New Yorker in me automatically took over when I saw that.  I now return you all to this thread.


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#9 Jonathan Tinsley

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Posted 25 November 2015 - 03:54 PM

 

So. Cal is like New York as a popular backdrop for Hollywood films/TV shows... and I do sometimes drop out of my 'willingly suspended disbelief' mode when a character needs to get from one place to another in LA... and takes a few 'minutes'... when I know it would take an hour or 2 just to go 10 miles... then there's parking... heck I've had the meter maid/man hit my car with in 'seconds' of parking... to write out a ticket... and these movie jokers seem to be able to 1) find parking, and 2) park almost anywhere with impunity... except of course when parking violations are a plot device...

To be fair, I think that's a bit trivial.  I would never want to go through watching a character find parking / sitting in traffic unless it had an impact on the story.


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#10 David Mullen ASC

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Posted 25 November 2015 - 04:22 PM

As far as I know, the show is shot in NYC.

 

Related to this, when I told my doctor, who grew up in NYC and left in 1980, that I shot "Smash", he said "Where do you shoot it?"  "In Manhattan..." I said, then he replied "It looks too clean to be New York City".  Well, he hasn't been back there since 1980 so I'm not surprised that the city looks a lot cleaner now.

 

But as for the A-Train issue, I'm sure they shoot in some non-used subway car set-aside for production, so it's probably not the ones used on the A line.


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#11 timHealy

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Posted 25 November 2015 - 08:39 PM

as a native new yorker ... the train did not bother me.  

 

You know they do buy new cars once in a while and make reefs out of old decommissioned ones?

 

 

I don't know if they built a train car for the show though I could find out. Person Of Interest did have a standing train car built at Silvercup. Perhaps they "borrowed" it.

 

But the typical subway lines the MTA lets production use are the Times Square shuttle and one of the trains at the Hoyt Schermerhorn station for moving train interiors. Also the subway museum near Hoyt Schermerhorn for non moving train interiors. There was also another line, maybe it was an F train near Prospect Park in the Kensington neighborhood.

 

best

 

Tim


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#12 John E Clark

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Posted 25 November 2015 - 08:47 PM



To be fair, I think that's a bit trivial.  I would never want to go through watching a character find parking / sitting in traffic unless it had an impact on the story.

 

These things are subtle... another one is this scene from "Back to the Future"(1985)... Most people would probably not even notice... unless one happened to live in a place where there use to be a US 395... or still is, like north of Victorville... or know the convention of numbering of East/West being even numbers, North/South being odd numbers... and in San Diego in particular, there's Interstate I-8 which intersects portions of old US 395, I-8 follows the path of US 80... with the San Diego segments of US 395 and US 80 being decommissioned in favor of I-15 and I-8 respectively...

 

Ok... so most people probably are not even remotely thinking of these sorts of things watching a movie... weird things take me out of films for moments... (Clicking on the image seem to give a larger version...).

 

 

Hillandmain1985.jpg


Edited by John E Clark, 25 November 2015 - 08:53 PM.

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#13 Stuart Brereton

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Posted 25 November 2015 - 09:55 PM

But what do people think of the framing...??


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#14 David Mullen ASC

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Posted 25 November 2015 - 09:58 PM

I remember as a student at UCLA watching a movie shot on campus and seeing a character run out of one building and immediately into a nearby building, only in reality the second building was all the way across campus, and in the opposite direction.  I see this spatial compression in NYC movies all the time, people walking near Soho suddenly being in the Upper Westside, etc.  In "Superman: The Movie", Lois and Clark step out of the Daily Planet building on 42nd St. and get held up near a street in the Financial District in Lower Manhattan.  That's a long stroll.


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#15 Bill DiPietra

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Posted 25 November 2015 - 10:15 PM

But the typical subway lines the MTA lets production use are the Times Square shuttle...

 

That's actually what the interior looked like, so if they used an actual subway car, that was probably it.


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#16 Robin R Probyn

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Posted 25 November 2015 - 10:24 PM

I guess its just the way it is.. if you know a particular city very well.. it will be something that your going to notice.. and it will always register how ever good the film is.. but its only a tiny fraction of the hoped for global audience I guess ! .. 

 

Lost in Translation had a few very odd location cuts too.. literally running around corners into a completely different part of Tokyo.. not even driving or trains .. but only Tokyoites would notice..  well actually its so huge.. only those that knew those locations..!   


Edited by Robin R Probyn, 25 November 2015 - 10:26 PM.

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#17 JD Hartman

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Posted 26 November 2015 - 07:54 AM

 

These things are subtle... another one is this scene from "Back to the Future"(1985)... Most people would probably not even notice... unless one happened to live in a place where there use to be a US 395... or still is, like north of Victorville... or know the convention of numbering of East/West being even numbers, North/South being odd numbers... and in San Diego in particular, there's Interstate I-8 which intersects portions of old US 395, I-8 follows the path of US 80... with the San Diego segments of US 395 and US 80 being decommissioned in favor of I-15 and I-8 respectively...

 

Ok... so most people probably are not even remotely thinking of these sorts of things watching a movie... weird things take me out of films for moments... (Clicking on the image seem to give a larger version...).

 

 

Hillandmain1985.jpg

 

What is the thing that you watch movies for?   Is it ever for pure entertainment, escapism or only for the purposes of dissection?  Unless it's a documentary or biography, doesn't filmaking involve the suspension of disbelief?  If the highway sign was important to the story in any way, they would have had the signs replaced.  For all intents and purposes Hill Valley could have been along US route 666 or 000.


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#18 Manu Delpech

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Posted 26 November 2015 - 08:17 AM

Nobody else but a total nerd would notice these things, if it really takes you out of it, I think it's more telling of the person who's watching. I've always disliked over-analyzing movies or tv shows, not that doing so is a terrible thing, but it means you're not in it, you're not enjoying it fully, some people are like that, too busy nitpicking everything. Like JD says: Suspension of disbelief, tons of movies shoot in places as substitutes for other places, do you ever think about it while watching the movie? I guess if you live in those places, and notice that a few details are off, maybe, but I just cannot imagine thinking this way. To each his own I guess.

 

Going back to the main topic at hand, Jessica Jones looks pretty good, it has a very different flavor to it obviously compared to Daredevil as it's not even a superhero show, it's a 100 % film noir, detective story that happens to have three characters with superhuman abilities at the heart of it. 


Edited by Manu Delpech, 26 November 2015 - 08:18 AM.

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#19 Phil Rhodes

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Posted 26 November 2015 - 08:28 AM

Yeah, and platform nine-and-three-quarters is just a wall, too.


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#20 timHealy

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Posted 26 November 2015 - 09:36 AM

I thought the last Batman movie did a great job cutting between New York, LA and Pittsburgh during its chase scenes. Im a jerk that knows NY very well, LA a little and Pittsburgh not at all. But with the help of Google Earth was able to track down many of the locations and how they tied it all together. It is seamless.

 

I'll try and find time to watch a few episodes of Jessica Jones this weekend, but it appears to be as dark as Daredevil, I'll have to watch it at night so I can see whats on the screen.

 

Tim


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