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Exposure Latitude of 7222 Double-X Negative Film


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#1 Mike Lary

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Posted 27 May 2005 - 02:31 AM

Does anyone know the range, above and below target exposure, in f-stops, for this film? I'm shooting some test shots this weekend that are mostly interiors with low light, and I'm trying to figure out what to expect in regards to shadow detail in particular. I'm not sure how to interpret the curve data on Kodak's site - if anyone has advice on that, I'd appreciate any pointers.

Thanks,
Mike
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#2 David Mullen ASC

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Posted 27 May 2005 - 10:05 AM

Does anyone know the range, above and below target exposure, in f-stops, for this film? I'm shooting some test shots this weekend that are mostly interiors with low light, and I'm trying to figure out what to expect in regards to shadow detail in particular. I'm not sure how to interpret the curve data on Kodak's site - if anyone has advice on that, I'd appreciate any pointers.

Thanks,
Mike

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Is this for telecine from the neg, print onto b&w print stock, or print onto color print stock? Because they all affect contrast. I don't have the answer to your question, just that there is some loss of shadow detail when printing, especially onto color print stock.
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#3 Max Jacoby

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Posted 27 May 2005 - 10:13 AM

Like David said it entirely depends on your combinatioj of processing and print stock.

For a film I did recently the Dop rated the stock at 160 Asa and printing on high contrast print stock, there was an image to about 4 under. I remember that after 1 2/3 stop it started getting pretty dark though. But that was on high con print stock, so regular print stock and/or telecine will yield a different result.
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#4 Mike Lary

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Posted 27 May 2005 - 10:42 AM

Thanks for the responses. I plan on telecining from the bw negative. The only prints I plan on making will be one-light dailies, so print quality is not a big concern. It looks like I need to research the telecine limitations as well as that of the film.

Mike
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#5 David Mullen ASC

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Posted 27 May 2005 - 06:28 PM

Thanks for the responses. I plan on telecining from the bw negative. The only prints I plan on making will be one-light dailies, so print quality is not a big concern. It looks like I need to research the telecine limitations as well as that of the film.

Mike

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Well, a telecine transfer off of the negative gives you access to the widest range of detail on the film. If this is for telecine-only, then why have one-light prints made? The question is what is your final product, because if it's a print, you have to shoot with that contrast in mind, not the telecine.

A contrast-ratio / exposure range test is one of the most basic things you do before shooting a movie. Just shoot some film and under and overexpose in one-stop increments and you'll find out yourself when you lose detail.
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#6 Mike Lary

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Posted 27 May 2005 - 08:06 PM

Thanks for the advice, David.

The final product will be digital. I planned on getting one-light prints so I'd have something to look at during the shoot (which will take at least a few weeks), identify problematic shots, and play around with rough cuts. I can't afford to telecine as I go, and from what I understand it's best to telecine all at once to ensure consistency between rolls. This is my first venture into shooting neg for telecine, so I'm not sure the best route. I appreciate your input.

Mike
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