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Recommendations Needed for Super 8 Camera's

Super 8

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#1 Elizabeth Olmstead

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Posted 02 December 2015 - 05:34 PM

Hello, 

 

I am new to the Super 8 world and I'm browsing the various online shops to try and track down a working Super 8 camera. 

 

There is a ton to learn about this format, so first let me say that I'm reading everything I can get my hands on but wanted to get some feedback from this crowd of experts. 

 

I'm wanting to buy a Super 8 camera that can do the following. 

- Shoot in various fps 18, 24, possibly 60? 

- Zoom lens or interchangeable lenses that shoot at f1.4, f2.8 and can shoot from at least 24 - 70mm 

- Lens that gets sharp images (or as sharp as possible with super 8) 

 

1. What camera's (name and model please) would you buy that are within a $500 budget. 

 

2. Is there any sort of site that anyone could recommend that could give me a condensed education on film types, developing processes, shooting techniques, etc? 

 

Thanks for helping a newbie out! 

 

 


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#2 Todd Pinder

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Posted 03 December 2015 - 02:28 PM

Beaulieu 4004ZM2 'Jubilee' Model with Angenieux 6-80mm f1.1.4


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#3 Glenn Brady

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Posted 03 December 2015 - 03:11 PM

Any of the late series Beaulieu 4008 cameras - like the one Todd mentioned, which is probably at 'the top of the heap' - would be a good choice, recognizing that many will require service to perform optimally (the cost of service can approach or exceed that of the camera).  There are fervent advocates for one brand of camera over another, but other top-of-the-line Super 8 cameras within your budget that most will concede deserve consideration include the Canon 1014XL-S, Nikon R10 Super, and Nizo Professional.  These cameras are decades old so, unless they've been serviced recently, they'll need cleaning, lubrication, and adjustment by a qualified repairer.  Unlike the Beaulieu 4008 series cameras, which accept interchangeable C-mount lenses, the Canon, Nikon, and Nizo cameras have fixed-in-place zoom lenses. 


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#4 Glenn Brady

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Posted 03 December 2015 - 03:23 PM

I should also mention the Leicina Special with its Leica M-mount, even though it may be above your budget.  Often supplied with the top-quality Schneider-Kreuznach 6-66mm f/1.8 Optivaron lens with or without Leicinamatic servo control, the camera can also accept the 10mm f/1.8 Macro-Cinegon lens, thought by some to be the sharpest lens ever made for the Super 8 format.  The Leicina Special can accept most M-mount lenses and has a range of accessories including an intervalometer and shoulder stock + grip.  


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#5 Zac Fettig

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Posted 03 December 2015 - 04:14 PM

You want a Nikon R10. The footage is incredibly sharp and stable (for Super 8), It'll do what you want. It's more user friendly than the Beaulieu and the Leicina.

 

If you have to have everything on the list (e.g. must have f1.4), you're stuck with three cameras. The Nikon R10, the Leicina Special (which won't do 24 FPS) or the Beaulieu 4008 (a bunch of other Beaulieus will do what you want, but the 4008ZM2 or ZM4 are your best bets). The Leicina will need a lens adapter, as the Optivaron is f1.8 fully open.

 

The Leicina (Leica M mount) and Beaulieu (C Mount) can both use interchangable lenses. With adapters, both are capable of taking some seriously sharp glass (PL mount adapters exist for both).

 

If you want a good introduction to filmmaking basics, I recommend The Filmmaker's Handbook:

http://www.amazon.co...makers handbook

 

Servicing a camera will cost a fair amount as well. I haven't priced it out in a while, but figure at least $300 for an unknown camera.  Nikon and Leica stopped making cameras in the late 70s. The last Canon was built in the early 80s ('83 maybe?). The last Beaulieu was built in the early 90s. The only camera built since then is the Logmar (with a $$$ pricetag).

 

You could always buy a camera for cheap off ebay, cross you fingers and shoot a test film. I've gotten very nice cameras by doing this.

 

Film types... you 've got two (maybe 3 if you're willing to scour the globe.) Black and white reversal, or color negative. Color reversal used to exist and some people in Europe still have it. Reversal means it can be projected as developed. Negative means it needs to be converted before it can be used; either a workprint or telecine. Some people love one or the other. Personally, I prefer the Kodak color negative stocks for shooting footage and Tri-X for test films.

 

Developing... you're best off handing that off to a lab. It's tricky work (especially for color negative).

 

Also, keep in mind that film will run around $26 per cartridge. That's about 2min 40 seconds at 24FPS. Figure another $35ish for developing and telecine, per cartridge. 

 

You can get film from Kodak:

http://motion.kodak....ation/index.htm

 

I always like Cinelab for processing and telecine.


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#6 Elizabeth Olmstead

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Posted 03 December 2015 - 04:24 PM

Thanks for responding  Zac, Glen, and Todd! Thats really helpful! 

 

Any thoughts on where you would send your camera for service? Places you use and trust? 


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#7 Glenn Brady

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Posted 03 December 2015 - 04:57 PM

Böjrn Andersson, Filmkonsult Svebaco KB, Vidholmsbackkarna 54, 165 72 Hasselby, Sweden is generally acknowledged as the best repairer of Beaulieu equipment.  He did expert work for me.  You can contact him (I think) at bjorn.andersson@brevet.nu or +46 (0) 8-38 10 74.  


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#8 Todd Pinder

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Posted 03 December 2015 - 06:22 PM

 

Böjrn Andersson, Filmkonsult Svebaco KB, Vidholmsbackkarna 54, 165 72 Hasselby, Sweden is generally acknowledged as the best repairer of Beaulieu equipment.  He did expert work for me.  You can contact him (I think) at bjorn.andersson@brevet.nu or +46 (0) 8-38 10 74.  

 

 

Does Bernie still service Beauliues in the States? How about Duall?


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#9 Glenn Brady

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Posted 03 December 2015 - 06:24 PM

 

Does Bernie still service Beauliues in the States? How about Duall?

 

I'm reasonably sure they do, but I've no experience having equipment serviced by either.  


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#10 David Cunningham

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Posted 03 December 2015 - 09:16 PM

Bernie is great. He just returbed my eclair ACL and mags and they are better than new.

Edited by David Cunningham, 03 December 2015 - 09:17 PM.

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#11 Matt Stevens

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Posted 08 December 2015 - 10:04 PM

Nikon R10. I used three cameras on my film shoot in September and not only did it deliver images every bit as good as the Leicina Special (which I also used), but it was 100% reliable (unlike the Mini8 I rented from Duall in NYC). I have never had trouble with the R10. It's just perfect. It delivers every time. Period.

 

I am selling mine because I have moved to China and cannot possibly shoot Super8 over here. It would be too difficult. 

 

Here is a quickly color corrected (not by me) frame from the shoot. 

 

04%20Subway%20Quick%20Corrected.jpg


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#12 Chris Burke

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Posted 08 December 2015 - 11:01 PM

Nikon R10. I used three cameras on my film shoot in September and not only did it deliver images every bit as good as the Leicina Special (which I also used), but it was 100% reliable (unlike the Mini8 I rented from Duall in NYC). I have never had trouble with the R10. It's just perfect. It delivers every time. Period.

 

I am selling mine because I have moved to China and cannot possibly shoot Super8 over here. It would be too difficult. 

 

Here is a quickly color corrected (not by me) frame from the shoot. 

 

04%20Subway%20Quick%20Corrected.jpg

What about shooting Single 8?


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#13 Zac Fettig

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Posted 09 December 2015 - 07:31 AM

What about shooting Single 8?

 

Get a time machine. Single 8 is out of production.

 

Or try and find a reloadable cart. The perfs are the same as super 8. So in theory, you could load your own.


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#14 Marc Marti

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Posted 09 December 2015 - 07:55 AM

Don't really need a time machine for shooting single-8.

 

Reloading empty cartridges is quite easy and the quality is worth the effort. But anyway, it's not something that I would recommend to a beginner...


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#15 Todd Pinder

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Posted 09 December 2015 - 04:25 PM

Retro 8 has Single 8 with processing for 3200 yen, thats $26.36 with exchange rate a cassette!


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