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Beginner Super 8, Canon 1014 AZE, help!

Super 8Canon 1014 AZE Beginner short film need advice

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#1 Noelle Spangler

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Posted 07 December 2015 - 12:53 AM

Hey Everyone!

 

I am trying to buy a Super 8 camera for a short film I want to make. I have found a Canon 1014 AZE within my price range, and I would love/need advice on this camera. Is this a good camera for a beginner and what film would I need to buy for it?  I want to be able to transfer my film into my editor, how and where can I get this done?

 

Anyone who has operated or owns the Canon 1014 AZE, please let me know what you think of this camera overall.

 

Would really appreciate the help and advice on the Canon 1014 AZE the most.

 

Thanks!


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#2 Goran Barac

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Posted 07 December 2015 - 02:26 AM

Noelle,

I have Canon 1014 AZE camera last ten years and this is really great Super 8 camera. Maybe is a little bit complicated for beginners, but when you overcome all its functions you'll be thrilled with her possibilities! Auto and manual aperture working perfect, no problems with E-100D, Vision3 50D, 200T and 500T films, you have variable sector and 10x power-zoom...

The only drawbacks (this is my opinion!) are that 1014 AZE is not well balanced in hand and have a little "soft" picture with her Canon zoom-lens. More precisely, picture is not so clean (and not as detailed) as in (for example) Nizo S56 camera. So, it is understandable, because Nizo S56 has fantastic Schneider-Kreuznach lens...

 

Anyway, you will not regret if you buy Canon 1014 AZE! This camera is true workhorse for all shooting...


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#3 Zac Fettig

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Posted 07 December 2015 - 10:58 AM

The only real caveat for the Canon AZEs are the manual controls. The rubber wheel that lets you adjust the aperture tends to fail (these cameras are pushing 40 years old now), which causes the aperture to drift (the isis widers and tightens on its own). And they are difficult to repair (which is why a 1014 Auto Zoom tends to be more expensive than the more advanced 1014 Auto Zoom Electronic.. They're easier to repair. The optics are the same). They work great on full auto though.

 

I always liked the 814s a little better than the 1014s. They tend to be cheaper (a lot cheaper) and have a slightly sharper lens, at the trade off of some zoom range on the long end. Both are excellent cameras.

 

if you're planning on editing in a regular NLE (Premiere, Final Cut, etc.) You would normally have the film telecined by the lab or a telecine shop.


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Media Blackout - Custom Cables and AKS

Technodolly

Ritter Battery

Tai Audio

rebotnix Technologies

Rig Wheels Passport