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shooting 5284


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#1 huy

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Posted 27 May 2005 - 11:11 PM

hi:

i'm student cinematographer shooting a 35mm short on the discontinued vision 5284. any tips on working with the stock? i've done a test, and, tho i'm really happy with how the colors are rendered, it's a little grainier then i'd like, particularly during day exteriors.

would over-exposing a bit help? during the test i rated the stock at 500 for interiors and 320 (85 filter) for exteriors. we're shooting a mixutre of daytime exteriors and nightime interiors, and while i'd prefer to shoot a different stock for daytime exteriors it's not within the budget (the project is getting a special deal on a bunch of the '84).

any advice would be super helpful.

thanks
huy
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#2 David Mullen ASC

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Posted 27 May 2005 - 11:43 PM

Yes, rating it at 320 ASA (before the filter, as a base rating) would help, or rating it at 250 ASA and pull-processing by one stop. Either way, a little overexposing would help. Avoiding flat and low-contrast lighting with lots of midtones would help too, since the grain will be most visible in flat areas of midtones.
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#3 huy

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Posted 29 May 2005 - 04:35 PM

Yes, rating it at 320 ASA (before the filter, as a base rating) would help, or rating it at 250 ASA and pull-processing by one stop.  Either way, a little overexposing would help. Avoiding flat and low-contrast lighting with lots of midtones would help too, since the grain will be most visible in flat areas of midtones.

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thanks!
huy
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#4 John Pytlak RIP

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Posted 31 May 2005 - 09:04 PM

Slight overexposure generally helps reduce the graininess of color negatives, since more scene information is placed on the finer grained mid and slow emulsions. With more exposure, the image captured by the larger grained fast emulsions are the deep shadows, so they print darker making the grain less visible.

Some of the increased graininess you are seeing may be due to the age of the film, or improper storage conditions after it left Kodak's distribution.
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