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Eclair Shutter Angle


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#1 Jordan Brade

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Posted 28 May 2005 - 04:32 AM

I just figured out how to work the shutter angle thing! It's pretty cool, but I'm slightly confused about something: What angle does the shutter start at? Also, do those numbers on the thing mean that's what's being added on to the shutter angle, or that's what the angle becomes (sorry if that's not too good of an explanation)? I read somewhere on the board about capturing motion in a way as to not create motion-blur (an almost strobing effect) by setting the shutter at a 45 degree angle. How would I go about doing that?

Any help would be appreciated! Sorry if these are really dumb questions!
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#2 Stephen Williams

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Posted 28 May 2005 - 04:47 AM

I just figured out how to work the shutter angle thing! It's pretty cool, but I'm slightly confused about something: What angle does the shutter start at? Also, do those numbers on the thing mean that's what's being added on to the shutter angle, or that's what the angle becomes (sorry if that's not too good of an explanation)? I read somewhere on the board about capturing motion in a way as to not create motion-blur (an almost strobing effect) by setting the shutter at a 45 degree angle. How would I go about doing that?

Any help would be appreciated! Sorry if these are really dumb questions!

<{POST_SNAPBACK}>



Hi,

A closed shutter is 0 degrees, most camera's maximuim shutter angle is about 180 degrees, so the camera is open for 180 degrees and closed for 180 degrees. If a camera has an adjustable shutter then you can set 45 degrees open and 315 closed.

Stephen Williams DoP
Zurich

www.stephenw.com
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#3 David Mullen ASC

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Posted 28 May 2005 - 10:02 AM

Looking through the open lens port, when the shutter is at 180 degrees (normal), the mirror covers the shutter completely, but as you close the shutter down, you see a black disk shape emerge from behind the mirror, extending the size of the closed shutter, with painted notches and numbers on it telling you what degree you are at. I can't recall the smallest angle allowable in the NPR but it may be 45 degrees.

Always check to make sure the shutter angle is set correctly since this affects exposure.

The more closed down from 180 degrees you go, the less blur per frame (because the exposure times get shorter), making the motion crisper and more strobey.
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#4 John Mastrogiacomo

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Posted 28 May 2005 - 01:26 PM

I can't recall the smallest angle allowable in the NPR but it may be 45 degrees.


You are correct. The smallest angle for the NPR is 45 degrees. The ACL does not have a variable shutter. :)
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#5 Jordan Brade

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Posted 28 May 2005 - 02:40 PM

Thanks for the help guys! This really helped me out alot.
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