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Streaks N Tips


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#1 Evan Bourcier

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Posted 29 December 2015 - 08:28 PM

Ok - I just wanted to quickly ask about best practices with streaks and tips black hairspray dye. I picked up a can with a recent order of gels to play around with, and it seems pretty straight forward. I was just curious of any best practices/things to avoid. I tested it on a 75 watt bulb in my house and noticed some light smoke when I turned the bulb on, is that normal? Have you ever had issues cleaning off bulbs?

Related - are there any other odds and ends like this you love to have in your kit? 

Thanks,

 Evan

 


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#2 JD Hartman

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Posted 30 December 2015 - 09:30 AM

Yes, I've used to darken on side or just the top of practicals.  You may have sprayed on too much and it wasn't dry.  No problems cleaning it off. 


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#3 Adrian Sierkowski

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Posted 01 January 2016 - 04:10 PM

It kinda goes without saying; but never spray it on a bulb which is on-- bad things happen.


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#4 Joshua Davies

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Posted 02 January 2016 - 05:21 PM

What is it your using the spray for? Reduce the intensity, shape the light? Sorry if this is silly, I'm a student and haven't heard of this before.


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#5 Satsuki Murashige

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Posted 02 January 2016 - 05:33 PM

It's basically used as a spray-on ND for light bulbs. Darkens the side of the bulb facing the lens so it doesn't blow out as much.
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#6 Joshua Davies

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Posted 02 January 2016 - 05:43 PM

It's basically used as a spray-on ND for light bulbs. Darkens the side of the bulb facing the lens so it doesn't blow out as much.

Thanks!


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#7 JD Hartman

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Posted 02 January 2016 - 06:57 PM

It kinda goes without saying; but never spray it on a bulb which is on-- bad things happen.

 

Seriously....first hand experience? 

 

Think I might have done just that when shooting in a bar and needed to kill the hot spot all the pendant lights were creating on the table tops.  Don't recall the outcome.  Do recall that when the shoot was over, the bartender thought that something had "happened" to all the bulbs and began changing them out......because they had all gone black on the ends


Edited by JD Hartman, 02 January 2016 - 06:59 PM.

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#8 Adrian Sierkowski

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Posted 02 January 2016 - 07:29 PM

If the bulb is hot enough the temperature change from it being an aerosol can cause the bulb to pop-- and yep, did it once awhile ago, never again.


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#9 JD Hartman

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Posted 02 January 2016 - 08:39 PM

Good advice and common sense shall prevail.


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