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New to Super 8 in general - Canon 518 SV Autozoom

Canon 518 SV Autozoom super 8

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#1 Matt Gibson

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Posted 30 December 2015 - 09:42 PM

Was just given a Canon 518 SV Autozoom and am really excited to use it, except I don't know how.

 

Main questions 

•What film cartridges does it take and where can I buy those from?

•How do I set the aperture correctly?

•How do I know when to turn sunlight/tungsten filters on and off when using different film?

•Where I can I get it digitally processed to view on my computer?

 

And if you have any general tips/tutorials on what to do with a dingbat like me who has no clue where to start, that would be great.

 

Cheers,

Matt


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#2 Freya Black

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Posted 31 December 2015 - 04:30 AM

Cool camera. Here  is some info from the super 8 wiki:

 

The built-in Wratten filter 85 is withdrawn using a special key which has to be inserted in a hole on the top of the camera. As many used cameras do not have this filter-key anymore (because the owner has lost it), it is very simple to replace it using a piece of plastic shaped as Greek letter "P". Its dimensions are:

  • height: 1,8 cm
  • lenght: 2 cm

This is an undervalued Canon with some of the features of the 814E and 1014E models at low cost. Its merits include 24fps running speed, no separate meter battery required and full cartridge film speed sensing. It probably does not have a solenoid release so beware "flash frames" when starting and stopping with the electric remote control button like the original 814 Autozoom. My example came in a smart black hard case that is much more durable than the soft cases supplied with later Canons that have mostly distintegrated after 35 years. The accessory 1.6 x front teleconverter is worth having making the zoom lens 15 to 76mm. A similar wide angle converter is useful too.


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#3 Freya Black

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Posted 31 December 2015 - 04:48 AM

Hiya Matt,

 

lots of questions and I only have time to answer some of them.

I assume it takes super 8 cartridges as your title seems to suggest it is a super 8 camera, although it's worth noting there is a single 8 version of this camera that looks identical too.

..

You don't say anything about where you live, so that makes it harder to advise about carts.

If you are in the USA, then you could buy off Kodak direct.

Otherwise maybe try John Scwind of International film brokers.

There are loads of places to buy carts tho but I don't know where you are.

 

The original Kodachrome film that isn't made anymore and is a pain and expensive to get processed was a 40ASA tungsten film.

The camera thus tends to assume film is tungsten. It has an internal plastic filter for daylight shooting. As a result it's best to keep it on  the tungsten (lightbulb?) setting if possible with current films.

 

A lot of your questions depend where you are based.

 

Freya


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#4 Freya Black

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Posted 31 December 2015 - 04:59 AM

I have a new article (or most likely series of articles) about all the Super 8 stuff coming out at Red Shark in the new year I think. That explains lots of stuff better that I am here so keep an eye out for that.

 

Film Stocks:

 

There are a fair few stocks out there so I'm just going to talk about the main Kodak ones briefly:

 

Tri-X B&W. Very grainy and grungey and cool. This is the only stock Kodak makes as reversal right now, so is the only one you can stick in a projector and project right away after processing. If you want Colour reversal then you will need to search out that Agfa stock that is kicking about.

 

Vision Negative: This is the stuff the new Star Wars / Hateful Eight was shot on, only sliced up into really tiny thin strips only 8mm wide. There are 3 stocks available in S8 carts. Vision 50D which is a nice outdoor stock with low grain. Very beautiful. Kodak 200T. A Tungsten stock with a bit more grain but not as much as 500T which is the grainiest but also the fastest stock, so you can shoot in really low light levels, especially with an XL camera.

 

Oh and of course the negative stocks need to be telecined to video before you can see them properly too.

You cant just process them and stick them in a projector.

 

Freya


Edited by Freya Black, 31 December 2015 - 05:02 AM.

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