Jump to content




Photo

Tips on using red gels


  • Please log in to reply
9 replies to this topic

#1 Tyler Clark

Tyler Clark
  • Basic Members
  • PipPip
  • 74 posts
  • Cinematographer
  • Ohio

Posted 08 January 2016 - 04:03 PM

Ive used them before (mostly with Clog) but always felt they needed alot of extra work in post to get a real crimson, deep, saturated red. 

 

I believe I've always just used the Lee "party gel" red we have in house. 

 

Is it possible to get deeper, more saturated reds through gels in camera?


  • 0




#2 Bill DiPietra

Bill DiPietra
  • Sustaining Members
  • 2265 posts
  • Cinematographer
  • New York City

Posted 08 January 2016 - 04:11 PM

Depends on how deep we're talking, but this one worked for me.


  • 0

#3 Tyler Clark

Tyler Clark
  • Basic Members
  • PipPip
  • 74 posts
  • Cinematographer
  • Ohio

Posted 08 January 2016 - 04:22 PM

Depends on how deep we're talking, but this one worked for me.

Awesome! Do you have any stills? would love to see em!


  • 0

#4 Bill DiPietra

Bill DiPietra
  • Sustaining Members
  • 2265 posts
  • Cinematographer
  • New York City

Posted 08 January 2016 - 04:57 PM

Awesome! Do you have any stills? would love to see em!

 

I'll try and dig something up.  PM me your e-mail address.


  • 0

#5 Miguel Angel

Miguel Angel
  • Sustaining Members
  • 563 posts
  • Cinematographer
  • Spain / Ireland / South Africa

Posted 08 January 2016 - 04:59 PM

I have used and loved the Red Storaro gel by Rosco. :) 

 

http://www.filmtools...-gel-sheet.html

 

Have a good day! 


  • 0

#6 Bill DiPietra

Bill DiPietra
  • Sustaining Members
  • 2265 posts
  • Cinematographer
  • New York City

Posted 08 January 2016 - 07:31 PM

Here we go.  This is a lighting test I did for my last film.  As the photo indicates, that's an ARRi 650w at full flood gelled with the Lee 789.  I don't think I had it hooked up to a dimmer.

 

Also, take note that this was taken with my iPhone 4S because I was in a rush.  It looks ten times better on film.

 

Lee 789.jpg


  • 0

#7 Stuart Brereton

Stuart Brereton
  • Basic Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 2575 posts
  • Cinematographer
  • Los Angeles

Posted 08 January 2016 - 10:25 PM

Ive used them before (mostly with Clog) but always felt they needed alot of extra work in post to get a real crimson, deep, saturated red. 

 

I believe I've always just used the Lee "party gel" red we have in house. 

 

Is it possible to get deeper, more saturated reds through gels in camera?

 

As with any gel, getting a more saturated color comes with underexposure. If you're placing colored gels on the lamps and then exposing as per your meter, you're not going to see saturated colors. You really need to be underexposing by at least a couple of stops to see deep saturation.


  • 0

#8 Satsuki Murashige

Satsuki Murashige
  • Sustaining Members
  • 3081 posts
  • Cinematographer
  • San Francisco, CA

Posted 08 January 2016 - 10:58 PM

I think one of the tricky things about super-saturated red in the digital world is that there are so few bits allocated to the color especially after compression for delivery that inevitably you're going to have a lot of aliasing artifacts. So that may be one reason you don't see it very often. This is less of an issue when it's only used in a small part of the frame like this:

image.jpeg
  • 0

#9 Adrian Sierkowski

Adrian Sierkowski
  • Sustaining Members
  • 6771 posts
  • Cinematographer
  • Los Angeles, Ca

Posted 09 January 2016 - 12:08 AM

The same is also marginally true to film-- though it's mostly because red is the softest layer in stock, if memory serves. Generally; if you have a fully red scene in a film it'll look--- wrong--ish-- and soft-ish. It's often best to have a bit of white somewhere 'round to get some contrast to the red.


  • 0

#10 Tyler Clark

Tyler Clark
  • Basic Members
  • PipPip
  • 74 posts
  • Cinematographer
  • Ohio

Posted 09 January 2016 - 01:23 AM

Thanks so much guys! This really helps out. Always appreciated!


  • 0


Aerial Filmworks

Rig Wheels Passport

Abel Cine

Zylight

Pro 8mm

Technodolly

Broadcast Solutions Inc

Glidecam

Visual Products

Paralinx LLC

The Slider

CineTape

Ritter Battery

rebotnix Technologies

Willys Widgets

Tai Audio

CineLab

Broadcast Solutions Inc

Visual Products

CineTape

Abel Cine

Tai Audio

Zylight

rebotnix Technologies

Aerial Filmworks

Pro 8mm

The Slider

Glidecam

Willys Widgets

Ritter Battery

Rig Wheels Passport

Technodolly

CineLab

Paralinx LLC