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Fresnel toggle switches


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#1 Tim de la Torre

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Posted 02 February 2016 - 07:54 PM

I've got some older Colortran studio fresnels that I need to replace the toggle switches on. I replaced one and it promptly melted (see attached picture). Does anybody know what temperature rating or kind of toggle switch I would need so it wouldn't melt? 

 

One pick is of the new, orange, melted switch. The other pic is of one of the original toggle switches. 

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#2 Michael LaVoie

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Posted 02 February 2016 - 08:08 PM

I replaced a toggle switch on a Colortran 1K Baby Fresnel many years ago. Only it wasn't on the unit itself but rather in the cord line.  I got one that was heavy duty all metal from Barbizon Electric in NYC.  It was about $35.  So they're not that cheap but it works great.  You could always put it on the cord and that'll keep the lamp from heating it up.  But I'd use metal anyway.


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#3 Tim de la Torre

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Posted 02 February 2016 - 08:12 PM

Thanks, that's a good idea. I suppose if I do that, I could just attach/solder/crimp those two wires to each other then and it would be permanently on. Or maybe ceramic wire nuts... I need some high-temperature way to insulate them from shorting on the metal casing. 


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#4 Phil Rhodes

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Posted 02 February 2016 - 08:34 PM

I suspect for that you'd want to look for one specifically described as for high temperature use.

 

Of course, it may also have melted through overloading. If it's a 1kW light and the local mains is 120V, the theoretical load is 8.3A. Ideally, find a switch with at least double that rating, for long-term reliability.

 

I would recommend against crimps or wire nuts. Both will offer considerably higher resistance than a soldered joint, which in itself will create heat. Of course, if it all gets hot enough to melt the solder, you still have a problem. It may be possible to get a switch with screw terminals, which would be a nice approach. I suspect it won't, though. Few switches would stand it.

 

P


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#5 Tim de la Torre

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Posted 02 February 2016 - 08:37 PM

They were 15AMP, so I think heat was the problem. I did look for high temp ones but the highest I could find were ones rated up to 85C, which doesn't seem to be high enough for the temperature I imagine is in that unit. 


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#6 JD Hartman

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Posted 02 February 2016 - 09:30 PM

Look on Mcmaster dot com  Should be able to find a switch with a suitable rating.  If you are going to use crimp terminals, you want ones with a high temp rating.


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#7 Phil Rhodes

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Posted 02 February 2016 - 09:38 PM

Plan B: get an in-line switch and thereby keep it outside the hot zone.


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