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#1 Mendes Nabil

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Posted 24 February 2016 - 01:09 PM

Hello guys! How are you?

 

I'm shooting an extra scene for my upcoming short, 

 

(here are some screenshots):

https://www.findspir...viewer=7yo4t98o

 

And i've chose the Super8 mm format. It's gonna be an exterior night scene with available light (Paris is pretty well enlightened by Night), and i need some advices.

 

Which camera is the best for my situation between these three:

 

-Canon auto zoom 814 Electronic

 

-Canon 514 XL-S

 

-Nikon Super zoom 8

 

From my understanding, the Fim stock i need is the Kodak Vision 3 500t, am i right? Will it fit these cameras?

 

Any advice about how to expose a Super8 camera compared to Digital? (i shoot Red mostly)


Thanks guys!


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#2 Roberto Pirodda

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Posted 24 February 2016 - 01:42 PM

The canon 514 XL  has 225° shutter so should be the best choice. About exposure if you shot with V3 5oo ASA you should be fine, keep the iris full open, do not worry about overexposure, you are shooting night exteriors assuming regular street lights


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#3 Mendes Nabil

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Posted 24 February 2016 - 04:43 PM

Thanks Roberto, but we can't set the exposure manually with the Canon 514 XL-s and from what the Super8wiki page says, this camera doesn't read 500T.. So clips will be overexposed..

 

http://super8wiki.co.../Canon_514_XL-S


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#4 Carl Looper

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Posted 24 February 2016 - 07:01 PM

You don't need to set it manually. The iris will automatically open to full because the camera will think you are using stock that requires the camera to open the iris even wider. But the iris won't be able to open any wider if it's at maximum.

 

If the film does happen to over-expose it won't be by anything worth worrying about. The lattitude of the film will be enough to make up for any deviation from an ideal exposure. And you'll get an opportunity to correct for any deviation during post.

 

C


Edited by Carl Looper, 24 February 2016 - 07:03 PM.

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#5 Peter Hodgins

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Posted 24 February 2016 - 08:52 PM

Make sure your cameras light meter works, the battery might be dead. See if you can set the exposure manually.


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#6 Roberto Pirodda

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Posted 25 February 2016 - 07:01 AM

I hate autoexposure, if you are shooting film you MUST learn before how to expose properly it . Very likely an autometer will close iris if  in your frame there is a street light, then open when the light goes away, and so on. Moreover the negative film will benefit from a little overexposure


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#7 Andries Molenaar

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Posted 25 February 2016 - 07:58 AM

I haven't exposed any 500T but I understand from reports that latitude is so wide that a general setting for an evening-street scene will suffice. I.e. use your experience or use a exporure meter suitable for low light. Advantage is that your images will not suffer from an exposure system interacting with light coming in or going out of the scene.


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#8 Will Montgomery

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Posted 25 February 2016 - 09:51 AM

The AutoZoom 814 is quite a tank of a camera, as long as you can find batteries for the meter and it's functioning, you'd have a great camera. I believe it only goes up to 24fps however.


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#9 Mendes Nabil

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Posted 25 February 2016 - 01:50 PM

Thanks for your replies guys! I also heard that overexposure is not that a big deal..

 

I have the opportunity to get a Canon 1014 (the basic model, not the Xl or Xls), again, i have to shoot a night scene..

Is the Canon 1014 (Max shutter/150) better than the 514 Xls (Max shutter/220) for night?


Edited by Mendes Nabil, 25 February 2016 - 02:01 PM.

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#10 Carl Looper

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Posted 25 February 2016 - 05:27 PM

The benefit of the 1014 over the 514 will be the ability to lock the iris so that it is not wanting to wander during a shot (as would occur if a bright light entered frame during a shot). The difference between 150 shutter and 220 shutter isn't really anything to worry about.  I'd opt for the ability to lock exposure over the slightly more available light.

 

C

 

Edit:  after looking at the 514 specs it suggests there is an exposure lock. An exposure lock is effectively a way of doing manual exposure. You move the camera around a scene until you get the f/stop you want and then lock it on that f/stop. Clumsy but effective. So to get a full open iris, just put your hand over lens so there's no light at all and the meter should read f/1.4 (or whatever the widest is which might be the needle swinging into a red zone ) and then locking the iris to that setting.


Edited by Carl Looper, 25 February 2016 - 05:37 PM.

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#11 Richard Tuohy

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Posted 28 February 2016 - 05:48 AM

Yes definitely use the 514 for low light shooting. Carl is right, even on auto the meter will think 'there isn't enough light' and keep the aperture on f1.4. Auto or manual doesn't matter in a low light situation especially when the camera thinks you are using a 160 asa film instead of 500. So, no it doesn't matter at all that the camera can't detect 500 asa because you will need the aperture on f1.4 anyway. If you are worried then yes, as Carl pointed out, the 514 has an ee lock which allows you to lock the iris at a particular aperture. Much like manual on other super 8 cameras. Use some blue tack or tape to hold the ee lock down. It's easy. Make sure you switch the filter switch to bulb or you will loose 2/3rds of a stop of light to the internal 85 filter.
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Also tagged with one or more of these keywords: Super8, Canon 514 XL-S, Nikon Super zoom 8, Canon 814 electronic, Kodak vision 3 500t, Night scene, Exposure

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