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Glow in movie "Casino"


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#1 John Mastrogiacomo

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Posted 01 June 2005 - 06:23 PM

Hi,

I was wondering if anyone knew how the glow was achieved on the whites in the movie Casino?

I can come close to duplicating it in post, but it is not exactly the same. I am assuming in the movie it was done with lighting and filters.

Thanks for any information. :)
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#2 Adam Frisch FSF

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Posted 01 June 2005 - 07:54 PM

Can't rememeber exactly what Bob Richardson, ASC, used now, but Casino was quite heavily filtered, either with nets or ProMists. Combined with Richardsons splashes and pools of highly overexposed light, the effect can sometimes look like a glow.
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#3 David Mullen ASC

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Posted 01 June 2005 - 09:43 PM

That was in his ProMist days before he started using nets on "The Horse Whisperer" and then "Snow Falling on Cedars".

ProMist combined with very overexposed spotlights, usually very narrow spot PARCAN's.
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#4 John Mastrogiacomo

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Posted 01 June 2005 - 11:18 PM

That was in his ProMist days before he started using nets on "The Horse Whisperer" and then "Snow Falling on Cedars".

ProMist combined with very overexposed spotlights, usually very narrow spot PARCAN's.

<{POST_SNAPBACK}>


Thanks for the info guys. I'll give it a try on tests for my next S16 music video. :)
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#5 David Mullen ASC

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Posted 01 June 2005 - 11:37 PM

Thanks for the info guys.  I'll give it a try on tests for my next S16 music video. :)

<{POST_SNAPBACK}>


The key: do not be afraid of the overexposure. Don't even bother measuring it, just play the very narrow spots as back or top-back lights and then them burn-out the detail there. Expose for the shadows more. What's good about very narrow spot PAR's is that the most intense area of overexposure is not that large so what flares out into white is not going to overpower the frame.

Framing the halation against a darker background helps make it more visible (as opposed to against a white cyc background, which wouldn't look so good, being white against white.)

Try something like a #1/2 Regular (white) ProMist.

If you are shining the light from a farther distance, you may need something with more power, like a big HMI PAR with a spot lens, or a Xenon, etc. Or a cluster of very narrow spot PARCAN's.

PAR 64's and PARCAN's can be ordered with wide, medium, spot, narrow spot, and very narrow spot globes. With HMI PAR's, you use lenses in front of the globe to focus it.
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